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The Microcosm 




THE SIMMONS COLLEGE ANNUAL 
PUBLISHED BY THE STUDENTS OF 
SIMMONS COLLEGE 

BOSTON MASSACHUSETTS 



VOLUME 



TWO 



Simmons College 

Boston Massachusetts 

19 11 



THE ANDOVER PRESS 

ANDOVER, MASSACHUSETTS 





Tmii 



i 



V^) 



Alumnae Association 41 

A Line of Type or Two 139 

Calendar, 1910-1911 5 

Classes 

1911 43 

1912 69 

1913 75 

1914 85 

Specials 94 

Class History 46 

College Organizations 

The Student Guild 99 

The Student Government Association 103 

Vespers 105 

Editorial Board, 1911 Microcosm ...... 107 

Glee Club 108 

Mandolin Club 109 

3 



College Hymn . 

Corporation 

Faculty .... 

General Science 

History of Simmons College 

Household Economics 

Instructors 

Library Science 

School for Social Workers 

Secretarial Studies . 

Simmons College Athletic Association 
Basketball .... 

Track Events .... 
Indoor Meet .... 

Social Events 

Social Calendar, 1910-1911 
Junior Prom. 

Student Government Dance 
Senior Freshman Party 
Dormitory Parties 
Washington Birthday Party 
Instructor's Club 

The Senior Class Executive Committee 

The Senior Class Chairmen 

The Junior Prom. Committee 



8 

7 

9 

30 

34 

25 

47 

29 

33 

27 

113 
115 
117 

119 

124 
125 
129 
130 
131 
132 
134 

136 

137 
138 







Sept. 


12-17 


Sept. 


19,20 


Sept. 


21 


Nov. 


24-28 


Dec. 


20 



1910 

Entrance examinations. 
Registration and condition exam- 
inations. 
Opening of the college 3^ear. 
Thanksgiving recess. 
College closes at noon. 



Christmas Vacation 



Jan. 3 
Feb. 4 
Feb. 6 
Feb. 22 
Mar. 23 



1911 
College opens at 9 a.m. 
End of the first Term. 
Opening of the second Term. 
Washington's Birthday, a holiday. 
College closes at noon. 



April 4 

April 19 

May 30 

May 29- June 9 

June 11 

June 19-24 

July 5-Aug. 12 



Spring Vacation 

College opens at 9 a.m. 
Patriots' Day, a holiday. 
Memorial Day, a holiday. 
Final examinations. 
Commencement Day. 
College Entrance Board exams. 
Slimmer classes. 



COMMENCEMENT WEEK 



Sunday, June 11, 3 p.m. 
Monday, June 12, 8 p.m. 
Tuesday, June 13, 5 p.m. 

8 P.M. 

Wednesday, June 14, 11 a.m 

1 P.M. 
8 P.M. 

Thursday, June 15, 1 p.m. 



Baccalaureate Sermon. 
Senior Dance. 
Class Day Exercises 
Glee Concert. 
Commencement Exercises. 
Alumni Luncheon. 
President's Reception 
Senior Luncheon. 



Wt)t Corporation 



HENRY LEFAVOUR, Ph.D., LL.D., Boston, President. 

ROBERT TREAT PAINE, 2d, A.B., Brookline. 

JOHN WASHBUBN BARTOL, A.B., M.D., Boston, Clerk. 

FBANCES BAKER AMES, Boston. 

FRANCES ROLLINS MORSE, Boston. 

WILLIAM THOMPSON SEDGWICK, Ph.D., Sc.D., Brookline. 

JOSEPH BANGS WARNER, A.M., LL.B., Cambridge. 

MARY MORTON KEHEW, Boston. 

HORATIO APPLETON LAMB, A.B., Milton. 

GEORGE HENRY ELLIS, West Newton. 

MARION McGREGOR NOYES, A.M., Winchester. 

GUY LOWELL, A.B., S.B., Brookline. 

MARY ELEANOR WILLIAMS, Brookline 

EDWARD D. BRANDEGEE, Brookline. 




THE CHAPEL 



Clje College Upmn 



Hail, Alma Mater! we pledge our love to thee, 
Bring thee our hearts and hands in full loyalty. 
Praising thy counsel and trusting thy truth, 
Lift we our song to thee; oh, guide thou our youth! 
Lift we our song to thee; oh, bless now our youth! 
Make us, thy children, generous and just. 
Send us to labor, when leave thee we must, 
Ready for service and worthy of trust. 

Hail, Alma Mater! thy praises we sing. 
One in allegiance, our tributes we. bring. 
Fair shall thy name be, trusted to our care, 
For thy dear sake our lives shall be more fair, 
For thy dear sake our lives shall be more fair. 
Make us, thy children, strong and pure and just. 
Send us to labor, when leave thee we must, 
Ready for service and worthy of trust. 

Sarah Louise Arnold 

8 



%\)t fatuity 



HENRY LEFAVOUR, Ph.D., LL. D„ 

President. Williams College, 1886; 
LL.D., Williams College, 1902, Tufts 
College, 1905. 

Additional course, University of Berlin. 

Instructor in Williston Seminary; Professor and 
Dean of Williams College ; President of Simmons 
College front 1902. 

Phi Beta Kappa, Trustee Williams College, Trustee 
Boston State Hospital, Colonial Society of Massachu- 
setts, American Academy of Arts and Sciences, New 
England Historic Genealogical Society, American 
Political Science Association, American Academy of 
Political and Social Science. Director Hale House 
Association, Executive Committee North Bennet 
Street Industrial School, St. Botolph Club, Boston 
City Club, City Club of New York. 




SARAH LOUISE ARNOLD, A.M., Dean, 
and Professor of the Theory and Prac- 
tice of Education. State Normal 
School, Bridgewater, Mass.; A.M., 
Tufts College, 1902. 

Principal of High School, Lisbon, New Hampshire ; 
Principal of Schools, St. Johnsbury, Vermont ; Prin- 
cipal of Training School, Saratoga Springs, New York ; 
Supervisor of Schools, Boston, Massachusetts ; Dean 
of Simmons College from 1902. 

Author of Stepping Stones to Literature with 
Superintendent C. B. Gilbert, St. Paul, Minnesota, 
1S97 : The Mother Tongue with Professor George L. 
Kitlredge, Harvard University, 1900; Manual of Com- 
position with Professor Kittredge and Professor 
Gardiner, Harvard University, 1907; Waymarks for 
Teachers, 1S94; With Pencil and Pen; Reading — 
How To Teach It, 1889. 

Member of Massachusetts State Board of Educa- 
tion ; National Council of Education, N. E. A. ; Chair- 
man New England Association of Home Economics. 





JAMES F. NORRIS, A.B., Ph.D., Pro- 
fessor of Chemistry. A.B., Johns Hop- 
kins University, 1892; Ph.D., Johns 
Hopkins University, 1895. 

Assistant Professor of Organic Chemistry. M. I. T. : 
Professor of Chemistry from 1904. 

Author of about thirty papers on Inorganic Chem- 
istry and Organic Chemistry in American and German 
Chemical Journals. 

Phi Beta Kappa, Technology Club, American Aca- 
demy of Arts and Sciences, American Chemical Society, 
Die Deutsche Chemische Gesellschaft. 




ALFRED BULL NICHOLS, A.B., Pro- 
fessor of German. A.B., Yale Univer- 
sity, 1880. 




FRANK EDGAR FARLEY, A.B., A.M., 
Ph.D., Professor of English. A.B., 
Harvard University, 1893; A.M., Har- 
vard University, 1894; Ph.D., Harvard 

University, 1897. 

Assistant in Euglish, Harvard University ; Assistant 
in English, Radcliffe College ; Instructor in English ; 
Haverford College ; Professor in English, Syracuse 
University ; Professor in English, Simmons College, 
from 1903. 

Author of Scandinavian influences in the English 
Romantic Movement, 1903; editor of Milton's Paradise 
Lost, 1898. 



10 



JEFFREi A. BRACKETT, A.B., Ph.D., 

Associate Professor of the Theory and 
Practice of Philanthropic Work, and 
Director of the School for Social 
Workers. A.B., Harvard University, 
1883; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins Univer- 
sity, 1889. 

President Department Charities of Baltimore, Mary- 
land ; President National Conference of Charities 
and Correction ; Director of School for Social Workers, 
Boston, from 1904. 

Author of Supervision and Education in Charity, 
1901. 

Massachusetts State Board of Charity. 



REGINALD RUSDEN (iOODELL, A.B., 

AM.,Associate Professor of Romance 
Languages. Bowdoin College. 

Additional courses, John Hopkins University, The 
Sorbonne, Grenoble, L'Alliance Franchise. 

Instructor at Bowdoin College; Instructor at M. I. 
T. : Associate Professor from 1902. 

Editor of L'Enfant Espion and Other Stories. 

Delta Kappa Epsilon, Phi Kappa Phi, Technology- 
Club, Modern Language Association, Salon Francais 
de Boston. 





FDWARD H. ELDRIDGE, A.M., Ph.D., 

Associate Professor of Secretaricd 
Studies. Temple University, Phila- 
delphia; A.M., 1903; Ph.D., 1908. 

Additional courses, Amherst, Chicago University, 
University of Pennsylvania. 

Secretary to College President ; Professor of Psy- 
chology, Temple College (now University) ; Director 
School of Commerce, Temple College ; Director School 
of Secretarial Studies, Simmons College, from 1902. 

Author of Hypnotism, 1902; Dictation Exercises, 
1910. 




II 






CHARLES KNOWLES BOLTON, A.B., 
Associate Professor of Library Sci- 
ence. Harvard University, A.B., 1890. 

Assistant in Harvard University Library, 1890-3; 
Librarian Brookline Library 1894-S; Librarian Boston 
Athenaeum Library from 1898. 

Massachusetts Historical Society ; New England 
Historical Genealogical Society. 

Publications : Saskia, Wife of Rembrandt ; The 
Private Soldier under Washington ; Circulating Li- 
braries in Boston 1765-1S65; Editor of Letters of 
Hugh, Earl Percy 1774-76. 

Instructor in Simmons College from 190S-10. Asso- 
ciate Professor of Library Science in Simmons College 
from 1910. 

SUSAN M. KINGSBURY, A.B., A.M., 
Ph.D., Assistant Professor of History 
and Economics. University of the 
Pacific, California, 1890; A.M., Leland 
Stanford Junior University, 1899; 
Ph.D., Columbia University, 1905. 

Teacher of History, San Francisco, Lowell High 
School ; Instructor in History, Vassar College ; Direc- 
tor of Investigation for Commission on Industrial 
Education. 

Author of Introduction to the Records of the Vir- 
ginia Company; Relation of Children to Industry in 
Report of Massachusetts Commission on Industrial 
Education. 

Kappa Alpha Theta, General Committee of Ameri- 
can Historical Association, Council of New England 
History Teachers Association. 

MARY ESTHER ROBBINS, Assistant 
Professor of Library Science, and 
Librarian. New York State Library 
School, 1892. 

Librarian New Britain Institute, New Britain, 
Connecticut ; Head Cataloguer, University of Nebraska, 
Lincoln, Nebraska ; Library Organizer for five years 
in various libraries ; Director of Library School, 
Simmons College, from 1902. 

Author of articles in technical magazines. 

Member of the Council of the American Library 
Association, Fellow of the American Library Institute, 
Treasurer Massachusetts Library Club. 

12 



MARIA WILLETT HOWARD, Assistant 
Professor of Household Economics, 
Thayer Academy, Braintree, Mass. 




KENNETH L. MARK., A.B., A.M., Ph.D., 

Assistant Professor of Chemistry. 
Harvard University, A.B., 1898; A.M., 
1900; Ph.D., 1903. 

Assistant in Chemistry, Harvard University: In- 
structor in Chemistry, Simmons College; Assistant 
Professor from 1906. 

Author of Thermal Expansion of Gases. 

Delta Upsilon, American Chemical Society. 



LESLIE LYLE CAMPBELL, A.M., 
Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Physics. 
Washington and Lee University; Har- 
vard University. 

Professor of Physics, Westminster College ; In- 
structor, Simmons College, from 1905-07; Assistant 
Professor, Simmons College, from 1907. 

Author of Thermal and Electrical Properties of 
Metals in Proceedings of American Academy of Arts 
and Sciences; Therino-magnetic Effect in Soft Iron, 
Physical Review. 

Member of American Physical Society. Fellow of 
American Association for the Advancement of Science. 
Member National Geographical Society, Member 
Mathematical and Physical Club, Associate Member 
Eastern Association of Physics Teachers. 





13 




PERCY GOLDTHWAIT STILES, S.B., 
Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Physi- 
ology. Massachusetts Institute of 
Technology, 1897; Ph.D., Johns Hop- 
kins University, 1902. 

Instructor. Bellevue Medical College; Instructor, 
Simmons College, 1907- ; Assistant Professor, Simmons 
College. 

Author of sundry scientific papers. 




ERNST HERMANN PAUL GROSSMANN, 
A.R., Assistant Professor of German. 
Berlin Normal College; A.B., Har- 
vard University, 1902. 

Instructor at Harvard University; Instructor, Sim- 
mons College, 1904-0S; Assistant Professor, Simmons 
College, from igoS. 




CHARLES MARSHALL UNDERWOOD, 
Jr., A.B., A.M., Ph.D., Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Romance Languages. Har- 
vard University, 1900; A.M., Harvard 
University, 1901; Ph.D., Harvard Uni- 
versity, 1905. 

Additional courses. University of Paris, University 
of Grenoble. 

Instructor, Harvard University, Dartmouth College, 
University of Cincinnati : Instructor. Simmons Col- 
lege, 1907-08; Assistant Professor, Simmons College, 
from 1908. 



H 



ARTHUR IRVING ANDREWS, A.B., 
PhD., Assistant Professor of History. 
Brown University, 1901; Ph.D., Har- 
vard University, 1905. 

Assistant in History, Harvard University: In- 
structor in History, Simmons College, 1006-09; Assist- 
ant Professor from 1909. 



FREDERIC AUSTIN OGG, A.M., Ph.D., 
Assistant Professor of History. De- 
Panw University; A.M., University of 
Indiana, 1900; A.M., Harvard Univer- 
sity, 1904; Ph.D., Harvard Univer- 
sity, 1908. 

Instructor in History,, University of Indiana; 
Assistant in History, Harvard University : Instructor 
in History, Simmons College, 1905-09; Assistant Pro- 
fessor in Simmons College, from 1909. 

Author of The Opening of the Mississippi. 1904; 
Editor of Fordham's Personal Narratives of Travels 
in the West, 1906; A Source Book of Mediaeval 
History, 1908. 

Beta Theta Pi, Phi Beta Kappa, Boston City Club, 
Authors' Club (London), American Historical Asso- 
ciation, American Economic Association. 



JAMES HOLLY HANFORD, A.B., Ph.D., 

Assistant Professor in English. Uni- 
versity of Rochester, 1904; Ph.D., Har- 
vard University, 1909. 

Instructor in High School, Rochester, New York ; 
Assistant in English, Harvard University ; Assistant 
Professor, Simmons College, from 1909. 

Psi Upsilon. 




15 




HARRY CLARK BENTLEY, C. P. A. 

Assistant Professor of Secretarial 
Studies. 

Assistant Professor of Secretarial Studies in Sim- 
mons College, from 1910. 

Fellow of the American Association of Public 
f ccountants : Fellow of the Society of Certified 
Public Accountants of New Jersey. 

Publications: Science of Accounts: various maga- 
zine articles on accounting. 



ALICE FRANCES BLOOD, Ph.D., As- 
sistant Professor in Chemistry. S.B., 
Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 
1903; Ph.D., Yale University, 1910. 

Instructor in Simmons College 1904-0S; Assistant 
Professor in Simmons College from 1910. 

Sigma Xi ; American Chemical Society; Association 
of Collegiate Alumnae : Association of the Women of 
the Massachusetts Institute of Technology ; American 
Home Economics Association. 

Publications : Some Peculiarities of the Proteolytic 
Activity of Paposin (with L. B. Mundel) ; The Erepsin 
of the Cabbage. 




HESTER CUNNINGHAM, A.B., Secre- 
tary of the Faculty. Badcliffe College, 
1899. 

Private Secretary ; Teacher in Private School ; Sec- 
retary of Simmons College, 1902-1906; Secretary of 
the Faculty and Instructor in English, Simmons Col- 
lege from 1906. 



16 



3tt0tructoi*0 



SOPHRONIA MARIA ELLIOTT, Instructor in Household Economics. 

Courses at Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Harvard University Summer Schools, 
Teachers' School of Science. 

Instructor in public schools of Providence and Boston, in summer schools, in School of 
Housekeeping; Instructor, Simmons College, from 1902. 

Author of Household Bacteriology, Household Hygiene, Chemistry of Cooking and Cleaning 
(with Mrs. Ellen H. Richards) ; pamphlets and articles in various magazines on Household 
Economics. 

American Home Economics Association, New England Home Economics Association, 
Teachers' School of Science, Health Education League, M. I. T. Women's Association. 

SAMUEL CATE PRESCOTT, S.B. (Assistant Professor of Biology, 
Massachusetts Institute of Technology). Instructor in Bac- 
teriology. 

Associate Professor, Massachusetts Institute of Technology ; Director, Boston Bio-Chemical 
Laboratory; Instructor, Simmons College, from 1904. 1 

Enzymes and their Application ; Elements of Water Bacteriology. 

Technology Club, Society of American Bacteriologists, American Chemical Society, Associate 
Editor, Centralblatt fur Bakteriology. 

ALICE NORTON DIKE, B.L., Instructor in Household Economics. 
Smith College, 1896. 

Additional courses, Harvard University Summer School, M. I. T. School of Housekeeping. 
Instructor, Robinson Seminary, Exeter, New Hampshire ; Instructor, School of House- 
keeping; Instructor, Simmons College, from 1902. 

MARGARETA ELWINA MITZLAFF, Instructor in German. 

Teachers' College in Germany. 

Additional course, Radclirfe College. 

Instructor, Wellesley College; Instructor, Simmons College, from 1903. 

EVA LOUISE MARGUERITE MOTTET (Brevet Superieur), Instructor 
in French. College of Montbeliard, France. 

Additional course, Romance Philology. 

Instructor, Wellesley College; Instructor, Simmons College, from 1903. 

ZILPHA DBEW SMITH, Instructor in Philanthropic Work. Boston 
Normal School. 

General Secretary Associated Charities of Boston; Instructor, Simmons College from 1904. 
Occasional papers in proceedings of National Conference of Charities. "A study of 
deserted wives and deserting husbands." 

Monday Evening Club, Conference Case Committee of Day Nurseries. 

17 



FRANCES SEDGWICK WIGGIN, B.L , Instructor in Library Science. 
University of Wisconsin. 

Additional courses at Pratt Institute Library School. 

Librarian of Colorado College; Instructor, Simmons, from 1904. 

MYRA COFFIN HOLBROOK, A.B., A.M., Instructor in English. Vassar 
College, 1894; A.M., Wesleyan University, 1899. 

Instructor, Simmons College, from 1905. 

HELEN JACKSON, A.B., S.B., Instructor in Secretarial Studies. Mt. 
Holyoke College, 1900; S.B., Simmons College, 1907. 

Additional course in University of Pennsylvania. 
Instructor, Simmons College, from 1904. 

JANE BOIT PATTEN, S.B., Instructor in Biology. Massachusetts In- 
stitute of Technology, 1906. 

Additional courses, at Hochschule, Dresden, Germany ; Marine Biological Laboratory, 
Wood's Hole. 

Instructor, Simmons College, from 1906. 

ELIZABETH ALLISON STABK, A.B., S.B., Instructor in Secretarial 
Studies. Wellesley, 1895; S.B., Simmons, 1907. 

Assistant Registrar, Wellesley College; Instructor, Simmons College, from 1906. 

GEBTRUDE WILLISTON CRAIG, Instructor in Typewriting. Pratt 
Institute. 

Secretary to President National Biscuit Company ; Secretary to Advertising Manager, 
Review of Reviews; Instructor, Simmons College, from 1907. 

ARTHUR STONE DEWING, A.B., A.M., Ph.D., Instructor in Psycho- 
logy and Ethics. Harvard University, 1902; A.M., Harvard 
University, 1903; Ph.D., Harvard University, 1905. 

Assistant in Philosophy, Harvard University; Instructor, Simmons College, from 1907. 
Papers in Journal of Philosophy; Introduction to History of Modern Philosophy; 
Laboratory note-books in Chemistry, Botany, Zoology, Physiology ; Life as Reality. 

HARRY WORTHINGTON HASTINGS, A.B., A.M., Instructor in 
English. Brown University, 1904; A.M., Harvard Univer- 
sity, 1906. 

Instructor, Williamsport High School; Assistant, Brown University; Instructor, Simmons 
College, from 1907. 
Chi Phi. 




-ci'€ 4 »' B * r Vg 



mmw. 



mmm?m 






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LAURA FISHER, Instructor in the Psychology of Child Life. S(. Louis 
Kindergarten Training School. 

Additional courses, Massachusetts Institute of Technology ; Columbia University. 
Supervisor St. Louis Kindergartens; Principal, Training School for Kindergartners, 
Boston; Director of Public Kindergartens, Boston; Instructor, Simmons College, from 1908. 

HARRIET ROSA PECK, R.L., B.L.S., Instructor in Library Science. B.L., 
Mt. Holyoke College, 1902; B.L.S., New York State Library 
School, 1904. 

Assistant in Gloversville Free Library, from 1904. Cataloguer in Bates College, 1909-10. 
Instructor. 

AMY M. SACKER, Instructor in Decoration and Design. 

CLARA DELLA CAMPBELL, A.B., A.M., Ph.D., Instructor in Romance 
Languages. Allegheny College. 

Instructor, Simmons College, from 1908. 
Kappa Alpha Theta, Phi Beta Kappa. 

GRACE FLETCHER, Instructor in Sewing. Pratt Institute. 

Instructor in public schools, Allegheny, Perm., and in Y. W. C. A. evening school, 
Pittsburgh. 

Instructor, Simmons College, from 1908. 

BERTHA MARION PILLSBURY, A.B., A.M., Instructor in English. 
University of Illinois, 1895; A.M., Radcliffe College, 1898. 

Instructor at University of Illinois, at Bryn Mawr College, Instructor, Simmons College, 
from 1908. 

Phi Beta Kappa. 

HESTER RIDLON, S.B., Instructor in Household Economics. Univer- 
sity of Chicago; S.B., Columlra University. 

Instructor, Simmons College, from 190S. 
Articles in American Home Economics Journal. 

Alpha Epsilon Iota, Delta Epsilon, Woman's University Club, New York City. American 
Home Economics Association, New England Home Economics Association. 

ELLA JOSEPHINE SPOONER, Instructor in Sewing. Framingham 
Normal School, 1896. 

Additional courses at Harvard Summer School, Simmons College, Columbia University 
Summer School. 

Instructor at Perkins Institute, Boston Trade School for Girls; Instructor, Simmons College, 
from 1907. 

JENNIE HINMAN WELD, Instructor in Institutional Management. 

19 



BESSIE MARION BROWN, S.B., Instructor in Chemistry. Simmons 
College, 1907. 

Instructor, Simmons College, from 1907. 

FLORENCE SOPHRONIA DIALL, Instructor in Physical Training. 
Sargent Normal School of Physical Training, 1901. 

Additional courses at DePauw University, Harvard University Summer School, Woods Hole 
Biological Laboratory. 

Instructor, Vassar College, Physical Director, Y. W. C. A., Terre Haute, Indiana; Instructor, 
Simmons College, from 1909. 

Kappa Alpha Theta. 

CHARLOTTE PENNIMAN EBBETS, Instructor in Household Econ- 
omics. Pratt Institute. 

Additional courses, University of Pacific. 

Dietitian, New York City ; Instructor, Simmons College, from 1909. 

CATHARINE SPENCER TRACEY, Instructor in Library Science in 
Simmons Summer School. Pratt Institute Library School. 

ISADORE GILBERT MUDGE, Ph.R., B.L.S., Instructor in Library 
Science. Cornell University, 1897; B.L.S., N. Y. State Library 
School, 1900. 

Reference Librarian and Assistant Professor of Library Economy, University of Illinois; 
Librarian, Bryn Mawr College ; Instructor, Simmons College, from 1910. 

A Thackeray Dictionary, joint author with M. E. Sears. 

Kappa Alpha Theta, Phi Beta Kappa, American Library Association, American Biblio- 
graphical Society, New York Library Club. 

GEORGE PRESTON BACON, A.M., Instructor in Physics. Dartmouth 
College; University of Berlin. 

Instructor, Simmons College, from 1910. 

Theta Delta Chi ; Phi Beta Kappa ; American Association for the Advancement of Science ; 
American Physical Society : American Astronomical and Astrophysical Society. 

LOTTA JEAN BOGART, A.B., Instructor in Chemistry. Cornell Uni- 
versity, A.B., 1910. 

Instructor, Simmons College, from 1910. 

ANNETTE FOLLETT CHASE, Instructor in Cooking. Pratt Institute, 
1903. 

Instructor, Simmons College, from 1910. 



20 



ISABELLA MITCHELL COOPER, A.B., B.L.S., Instructor in Library 
Science. Barnard College; Teachers' College; Columbia 
University, A.B. ; New York State Library School, B.L.S. 



Instructor, Simmons College, from igio. 
Zeta Theta Pi. 



IANE ERNISSE CROWE, A.M., Instructor in English. A.B., University 
of Bochester, 1905; A.M., 1909; A.M., Columbia University, 1910. 



Instructor, Simmons College, from 1910. 
Theta Eta; Phi Beta Kappa. 



GOBHAM WALLEB HARRIS, A.M., Instructor in Chemistry. A. B. 
Harvard University, 1907; A.M., 1909. 



Instructor, Simmons College, from 1910. 

Phi Beta Kappa; American Chemical Society. 

LAUBA KATHEBINE JOHNSON, A.B., Instructor in Physics. A.B., 
Cornell University, 1910. 

Instructor, Simmons College, from 19 10. 
Courses in Massachusetts of Technology. 
Phi Beta Kappa. 

ALICE MABEL JOBDAN, Instructor in Library Science. (Custodian 
of the Children's Department, Boston Public Library.) 

Instructor, Simmons College, from 1910. 

SYLVESTEB KLINE LOY, Ph.D., Instructor in Chemistry. A. B. 
Franklin and Marshall College, 1905; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins 
University, 1910. 

Instructor, Simmons College, from 1910. 

American Chemical Society ; German Chemical Society. 

BLANCHE LEONABD MOBSE, A.B., Assistant in Drawing and Design. 

MABELLE LOUISE MOSES, A.M., Instructor in History. A.B., Leland 
Stanford Jr., University; A.M., Badcliffe College. 

Instructor, Simmons College, since 1910. 

Gamma Phi Beta ; New England History Teachers' Association ; American Historical Asso- 
ciation ; Women's Municipal League. 

Publications; The Regulation of Private Employment Agencies in the United States. 

ABBY JOSEPHINE SPEAB, Instructor in Millinery. 

21 



MARY BOSWORTH STOCKING, B.S., Assistant in Household Eco- 
nomics. B. S,. Simmons College, 1910. 

ETHEL POWYS STURTEVANT, A.B., S.B., Assistant in Secretarial 
Studies. Tufts College, 1907; S. B., Simmons College, 1909. 

Assistant, Simmons College, from 1908. 

Alpha Omicron Pi, Tufts College Alumnae Association. 

MASON WHITING TYLER, A.B., A.M., Instructor in History. Amherst 
College; A.M., Harvard University. 

Instructor, Simmons College, from 1910. 

Psi Upsilon ; Phi Beta Kappa; American Historical Association. 

ARTHUR FISHER WHITTEM, Ph.D., Instructor in Spanish. 

Instructor, Simmons College, from 1910. 

ANNABEL MARY YOUNG, S.B., Instructor in Cooking. S.B., Simmons 
College, 1910. 

Instructor, Simmons College, from 1910. 

ABBY L. SARGENT, Lecturer on Cutter Classification. Salem 
Normal School. 

Librarian Wilmington, North Carolina ; Middlesex Mechanics' Association, Medford 
Public Library. 

Applachian Mountain Club, Massachusetts Library Club. 

WILLIAM THOMPSON SEDGWICK, Ph.B., Ph.D., Lecturer on 
Sanitary Science. Ph.B., Yale University, 1877; Ph.D., Johns 
Hopkins University, 1881. 

Professor of Biology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology ; Biologist to Massachusetts 
Board of Health ; Curator Lowell Institute, Boston ; Trustee, Simmons College ; Lecturer, 
Simmons College, from 1902. 

General Biology: Principles of Sanitary Science and Public Health. 

St. Botolph Club, Warren Farm Golf Club, Board of Directors Sharon Sanitorium. 

ELIOT THWING PUTNAM, A.B., Lecturer on Architecture. 

STANLEY BBAMPTON PARKER, Lecturer on Architecture. 

GERTRUDE LEE ALLISON, S.B., Assistant in the Library. 
Simmons College, 1907. 

Assistant in the Library, Simmons College, from 1907- 

22 



RUTH BRYANT, S.B., Assistant in Biology. Simmons College, 1909. 

Assistant, Simmons College, from 1909. 

MARGERY HUGHES, Assistant in Sewing. 

Instructor, Lima Kindergarten, Santer Mission School; Assistant, Simmons College, 
from 1909. 

Tau Kappa Pi. 



MAREL WILLIAMS, S.R., Assistant in the Library. Simmons Col- 
lege, 1909. 

Assistant in Library from 1909. 

DOROTHY MILLER ATKINSON, Assistant in Sewing. 

Assistant, Simmons College, from 1910. 

LUCIA RUSSELL RRIGGS, A.B., Assistant in English. Radcliffe 
College, 1909. 

Assistant, Simmons College, from igio. 

EMMA MARSHALL DENKINGER, A.B., Assistant in English. 
Radcliffe College, 1910. 

Assistant, Simmons College, from 1910. 

MARION GAGE, Assistant in Household Economics. Boston Normal 
Cooking School. 

Assistant, Simmons College, from 1910. 

RUTH HARRIOT PEIRCE, A.R., Assistant in Secretarial Studies. Mt. 
Holyoke College, 1907. 

Assistant, Simmons College, from 1910. 

CLARA MARGARET SIPPELL, Assistant in Cooking.. Drexel 
Institute. 

Assistant, Simmons College, from 1910. 

FLORENCE WETHERBEE MARK, S.B., Assistant in Chemistry. 
Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 

Assistant, Simmons College, from 1910, 

23 



f^ou0ri)ofo ©conomtc! 



Department Faculty 

Chairman: Sarah Louise Arnold, A.M., Professor of the Theory and 
Practice of Education. 

Susan Myra Kingsbury, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Economics. 

Maria Willett Howard, Assistant Professor of Household Economics. 

Kenneth Lamartine Mark, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Chemistry. 

Leslie Lyle Campbell, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Physics. 

Percy Goldthwait Stiles, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Physiology. 

Alice Frances Blood, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Chemistry. 

Sophronia Maria Elliott, Instructor in Household Economics. 

Alice Norton Dike, B.L., Instructor in Household Economics. 

Edith Arthur Beckler, S.B., Instructor in Biology. 

Grace Fletcher, Instructor in Sewing. 

Hester Bidlon, A.M., Instructor in Household Economics. 

Ella Josephine Spooner, Instructor in Sewing. 

Jennie Hinman Weld, Instructor in Institutional Management. 

Charlotte Penniman Ebbets, Instructor in Household Economics. 

Annette Follett Chase, Instructor in Household Economics. 

Blanche Leonard Morse, A.B., Instructor in Decoration and Design. 

Mary Bosworth Stocking, S.B., Instructor in Household Economics. 

Annabel Mary Young, S.B., Instructor in Household Economics. 



25 



imrtattal £s>ttrtac0 



Department Faculty 

Chairman: Edward Henry Eldridge, Ph.D., Associate Professor of 
Secretarial Studies. 

Frank Edgar Farley, Ph.D., Professor of English. 

Alfred Bull Nichols, A.B., Professor of German. 

Susan Myra Kingsbury, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Economics. 

Charles Marshall Underwood, Ph. D., Assistant Professor of Romance 
Languages. 

Frederic Austin Ogg, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of History. 

Harry Clarke Bentley, C.P.A., Assistant Professor of Secretarial 

Caroline Jewell Cook, A.B., LL.B., Instructor in Commercial Law. 

Helen Jackson, A.B., S.B., Instructor in Secretarial Studies. 

Elizabeth Allison Stark, A.B., S.B., Instructor in Secretarial Studies. 

Gertrude Williston Craig, Instructor in Secretarial Studies. 

Ethel Powys Sturtevant, A.B., S.B., Instructor in Secretarial Studies. 



27 



<**.** 




SLifcrarp &rimtr 



Department Faculty 

Chairman: Mary Esther Robbins, Assistant Professor of Library 
Science. 

Frank Edgar Farley, Ph.D., Professor of English. 

Alfred Bull Nichols, A.B., Professor of German. 

Charles Knowles Bolton, A.B., Associate Professor of Library Science. 

Charles Marshall Underwood, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Romance 
Languages. 

Arthur Irving Andrews, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of History. 

Frances Sedgwick Wiggin, B.L., Instructor in Library Science. 

Isadore Gilbert Mudge, Ph.B., B.L.S., Instructor in Library Science. 

Isabella Mitchell Cooper, A.B., B.L.S., Instructor in Library Science. 

Alice Mabel Jordan, Instructor in Library Science. 

Abby L. Sargent, Lecturer on Cutter Classification. 






CJ£J\IC£ 




Enteral darner 



Department Faculty 

Chairman: Kenneth Lamartine Marks, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of 
Chemistry. 

Leslie Lyle Campbell, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Physies. 

Percy Goldthwait Stiles Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Physiology. 

Alice Frances Blood, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Chemistry. 

Samuel Cate Prescott, S.B., Instructor in Bacteriology. 

Edith Arthur Beckler, S.B., Instructor in Biology. 

Jane Bolt Patten, S.B., Instructor in Biology. 

Bessie Marion Brown, S.B., Instructor in Chemistry. 

George Preston Bacon, A.M., Instructor in Physics. 



30 



Lotta Jean Bogert, A.B., Instructor in Chemistry. 
Gorham Waller Harris, A.M., Instructor in Chemistry. 
Laura Katherine Johnson. A.B., Instructor in Physics. 
Sylvester Kline Loy, Ph.D., Instructor in Chemistry. 




C2ICKXQSO. 



31 




djool for foetal Woxktvs 



>ri)00l for foetal Wotkivs 



Jeffrey Richardson Brackett, Ph.D., Director 
Zilpha Drew Smith, Associate 
Theodore W. Glocker, Ph.D., Assistant 

Hfcmtntstratrtc 35oarti 
The Director of the School, Chairman 
The President of Simmons College 
The President of Harvard University 
Thomas B. Fitzpatrick 
Joseph Lee 
Frances R. Morse 
Francis G. Peabody 
Charles P. Putnam 
Annette P. Rogers 
Robert A. Woods 



33 




i0torj? of Simmons College 



FEW years ago, people said, "What is Simmons? Where 
is it? What does it do? Oh, I see — a business school! " 
When they learned that it was not a mere business 
school, but a college with a four-year course including 
academic as well as technical training, they realized that Simmons 
College was a departure from the established order of schools. 

The College was founded by John Simmons, a wholesale clothing 
dealer of Boston. By his wise and careful business investments he 
amassed a considerable fortune, and, having no male heirs, he drew 
up, on June 1, 1867, a will which made possible the future existence 
of this College. We may believe that from then until his death, on 
Monday, August 29, 1870, he thought much of this plan of his. 

The trust money was allowed to accumulate until 1899, when 
it reached the sum of $541,110.24, and the trustees then applied to 
the Legislature of Massachusetts for the right to incorporate. The 
Corporation met for two years before anything obviously definite 
was done, but during that time they were sifting, testing, and 
rejecting courses of study for the new College. Professor Sedgwick 
went to Europe to investigate and report on women's industrial 
schools, and similar institutions in America were thoroughly studied. 
The Corporation chose for its secretary Miss Hester Cunningham, 
who thus became the first officer of the College, and later appointed 
as President, Dr. Henry Lefavour, formerly Professor of Physics at 
Williams College, and from 1897 Dean of that college, and as Dean, 
Miss Sarah L. Arnold, who since 1895 had been Supervisor of Schools 
in Boston. Article XVI of the will said that the College should be 
established " for the purpose of teaching medicine, music, drawing, 
designing, telegraphy and other branches of art, science and industry 
best calculated to enable the scholars to acquire an independent 
livelihood." There were already sufficiently good and accessible 
institutions teaching medicine, music, drawing, and design; and 
telegraphy was not suitable to the plan in view. Upon consideration 

34 













of these facts the Corporation turned its attention to the " other 
branches." On October 9, 1902, the College was opened at 30 
Huntington Avenue, with an attendance of one hundred and forty-nine 
girls to whom it offered courses in Household Economics, Secretarial 
and Library studies, and Science preparatory to Medicine, Nursing, 
and Teaching. 

We can be sure of one thing about the first Simmons girls — 
they were good walkers! The dormitory, Simmons Hall, was at 
38 St. Botolph St., and numbers 45 and 47 on the same street served 
partly as dormitories, and partly as classrooms for the study of 
Household Economics. Shorthand and typewriting were taught at 30 
Huntington Avenue, where the College office was situated; instruction 
in languages and sciences was provided at the Institute of Technology. 
And then, as now, regular attendance was insisted upon, as a means 
of establishing businesslike habits and faithfulness to duty. We 
sincerely hope that those first students had better weather than we 
have on chapel days! 

The next year (1903) two floors of the new office building numbered 
739 Boylston St. were leased, 

and the rooms at 30 Hunt- 
ington Avenue, and at St. 
Botolph St., with the excep- 
tion of those used as dormi- 
tories, were given up. The 
Boston Cooking School 
transferred its management 
to Simmons, the old rooms 



at 372 Boylston St. being re- 
tained; its funds were put into what is now called the Sewall Scholar- 
ship. In this year, also, training in Horticulture was offered. There was 
to be a three-year programme — the first two years to be spent in 

35 




Boston studying theory, and the third year at the Amherst Agricultural 
College. The project was subsequently dropped on account of the 
small number of applicants. On Wednesday afternoon during the 
same year, the College gave a series of public lectures of special 
interest to students of household economy and sociology. Evening 
courses were given in Household Economics, Shorthand, Typewriting, 
English, French, Spanish, and German, but later it was found 
unadvisable to continue them. 

In 1904, the attendance increased to two hundred and eighty-two 
students. Two houses on Short St., East and West Houses, were made 
into dormitories, and in the following year the rooms at 730 Boylston 
St. were given up and South Hall, the Refectory, and the new College 
building on the Fenway were opened. Cards were sent out for the 
opening of the new main building, and afternoon tea was served for 
eight or ten days, during which time the public came in crowds to 
inspect it. For several weeks the College was kept open on Saturdays 
also, for the purpose of inspection. 

Meantime, while the Faculty was struggling over the arrangement 
of courses and classrooms, the one hundred and forty-nine girls who 

entered in 1902 were 
having troubles of their 
own. In their demands 
for social life the bug- 
bear of " precedents " 
met them at every turn, 
the Faculty being firm 
in their determination 
not to sanction rashly 
anything that might be 
regarded as a precedent for future classes. 

The President of the Class of 1906 writes, " Although we didn't 




36 



establish half the ' precedents ' that we hoped to, we do trust that future 
classes will appreciate the fact that the First Class steered the Simmons 
ship safely between the Scylla of a business college and the Charbydis of 
a nunnery!" In this they were helped to a great extent by Miss 
Arnold, who with her sympathy and tact aided them also to form 
the Guild, an organization which was in keeping with the best ideas 
and ideals cf the College. Its purpose was to promote fellow feeling 
and the general welfare of the students. 

There were two distinct senior classes at that time, all the girls 
who entered in 1902 forming the " First Class," and the girls who 
expected to be graduated forming the Class of 1906. These classes 
were conducted simultaneously but separately, and for the most part, 
harmoniously. They succeeded in establishing besides the Guild, the 
Honor System, and the beginnings of student government. The 
welcoming reception for new students, which is now a well-established 
tradition of Simmons, was instituted by the Class of 1906 in its 
second term. 

During its Freshman and Sophomore years, the class lived in 
very cramped quarters and worked very hard. The Faculty declared 

that the work was too 
hard to permit of much 
recreation; the girls, 
themselves, reluctantly 
admitted that there was 
no opportunity at Sim- 
mons Hall or Boylston 
Chambers. Through the 
courtesy of Miss Ho- 
maus they managed to 
get one dance in the 
Boston Normal School of Gymnastics. When, as Juniors, they moved 




37 



into South Hall, they hopefully renewed their struggles for social 
privileges. 

The Commencement Week exercises have been the same for 
every succeeding Simmons class, with one variation — 1906 conducted 
its Class Day in strict privacy. The first Commencement Week began 
with the baccalaureate sermon which was preached in the Mt. Vernon 
Church, by the Rev. Francis (1. Peabody, at 4 p.m; and the festivities 
ended Thursday afternoon, June 14, after the class luncheon. 
According to its President, immediately after the luncheon " the class 
assembled in the parlors of Simmons Hall to organize an Alumnae 
Association. Then the Alumnae Association gave a reception to the 
graduating class! and after the usual teary partings, not one of us 
could have told you the difference between 1902, 1906, and the Alumnae 
Association! " 

The one hundred and forty-nine girls who entered in 1902 still 
keep their organization intact, held together by the bonds of friendship 
and sentiment. Their class pin is shaped like a gold coin, bearing the 
letters S. C. and the words " Non quis sed quid, 1902." These girls 
were the pioneers of Simmons, and had to test all sorts of new ways 
that the Faculty might decide what was best for future classes. The 
class of 1911 may think that it has been experimented upon and that 
its courses have been changed and shifted about, but our lot has been 
mild compared to that of the earlier students. According to the class 
history, the Faculty was accustomed to end all discussions as to the 
advisability of a new course by saying wearily, "Oh, try it on 1906!" 
The rest of the history of the College belongs to our own times. 
In 1907 the Sage Foundation granted the School for Social Workers 
$7,500 to carry on certain lines of research. The following year they 
increased this grant to -$10,000. The number of students in all depart- 
ments kept increasing, and in 1907, North Hall was built. Two years 
later the new wing was added to the College itself, as it was found that 
there were not enough lecture and recitation rooms. When this new 

38 



wing was built, a small temporary gymnasium was included, and an 
Athletic Association has now been formed. Since 1908 the Church 
of the Disciples, on Peterborough St., has been used for the weekly 
services, and there, also, the graduation exercises have been held. 

We are still a young college, but we are rapidly being recognized 
as an important factor in the business world. Girls from other 
colleges come to us in increasing numbers, to be prepared for work 
other than teaching. You will find among our graduates secretaries 
to many college presidents, among whom is the President of Harvard, 
and to many large business corporations; you will find them as 
cataloguers in city and state libraries; they are teachers and institu- 
tional managers everywhere. Where they go, they carry stamped 
upon them the mark of the College — Efficiency in Service. No matter 
how careless and thoughtless a girl may be, if she has been at Simmons 
she is bound to have some conception of what those who organized 
the College have tried to make it mean. We are no longer pioneers, 
but we have an established standard which every graduate is expected 
to live up to. An opportunity waits for each of us as we pass out 
through the open door of our Alma Mater, and go forth " ready for 
service and worthy of trust." And ours alone be the blame if we 
are not ready, or if we fail in that trust. 




39 



ftlumnar teortatton 



OFFICERS 
Martha Wentworth Suffen, President. 

6S Buckingham Rd., Brooklyn 
Margery Boylston, Vice-President 

108 Central Ave., Milton 
Eva Whiting White, Secretary 

40 Wenonah St., Roxbury 
Theodora Kimball, Treasurer 

107 Greenbrier St., Dorchester 



directors 
Jessie Moore 

Boston, Mass. 
Louise Andrews 

Brookline, Mass. 
Gladys E. Litchfield 

Southbridge, Mass. 
Marion Burrage, Recording Sec. 

Cambridge, Mass. 



An attempt has been made this year to gather data to show 
what specific things the Alumnae of other colleges are doing, in order 
that we might have both a guide and an incentive for our work. At 
first the results but discouraged us: we seemed so small and helpless 
beside such great bodies as those of Smith and Vassar, which are able 
to make gifts, raise vast sums of money, found scholarships, or erect 
buildings, as the need arises. 

Then we turned to a more minute study of the history of these 
associations. In nearly every case, they are supported by members 
who were graduated as long as twenty, thirty, or forty years ago; 
they were organized and developed years before our college 
opened its doors to the class of 1906, and their accomplishments are 
the result of years of growth; their members are scattered all over the 
country, and their active membership numbers thousands. 

So we turned to see what we have done in our five years. A work- 
ing constitution has been made and adopted; the machinery of the 
Association has been set in motion; local organizations have been 
started wherever possible; the "Simmons Quarterly," which we hope 
will become in time one of the chief of the official publications of the 



4i 






S^ =-1 



College, has been published throughout the last year, and upon this 
the Alumnae are represented. Formerly, the only gathering of the 
Alumnae was at the brief business meeting held in June; last year was 
inaugurated, with great success, the first annual Alumnae luncheon. 
But the most important event of last year was the establishment of an 
Alumnae scholarship for the present year. 

In comparison with what older associations have done, our attain- 
ments seem small indeed; but considering the number of years that 
we have been at work, we may well be encouraged, and look ahead for 
a few years to an association of which we shall be proud. 

It is with the utmost gladness that we welcome each graduating 
class. In the proportion that our numbers grow, so shall our strength 
increase. We want each girl to feel her own opportunity to help along 
the work which has been started, and to realize that by giving herself 
to the Alumnae, she is repaying in some measure the debt of loyalty 
that she owes the College. 

Martha Wentworth Suffren. 



42 




Clasaof ^ - r 1911 



(^fftccrs 



MARGARET WITHEY 

President 

CHARLOTTE S. NOYES FLORENCE TRIMMER 

Vice-President Secretary 

LILLIAN M. WILLIAMS 

Treasurer 



45 



Ck00 ^t0torp— 1911 




OR four years we have been together here at Simmons. 
What we have done, as well as what we have not done, 
would fill volumes as large as those necessary to contain 
what we know, and what we do not know. But our 
deeds have been reviewed many times before. In the " Microcosm," 
Volume I, for 1910, will be found a resume of our trials and tribulations 
for three years. The Freshmen were informed (if our early struggles 
by the play given in their honor at the beginning of the year. Our 
aim, therefore, is merely to complete that recital, with perhaps a brief 
review of the main events which have contributed in bringing forth 
this grand and glorious climax — the Senior class of 1911. 

We have been through the various stages indicated by the parody 
on the Persian proverb. As Freshmen we " knew not, and knew that 

were consequently 



we knew not," and 
very humble and 
girls of our spirit 
Circus was our mas- 
the social line. This 
fluence on our col- 
ting the standard of 
tainments. It was 
making us feel our 




had not been much 
viously, separated 
different depart- 
During o u r 
because we " knew 
that we knew not," instructors and upper classmen joined in trying 
to teach us to know our places, and to stay in them. This discipline 
was salutary and we came out of the fire purified. Our spirit was not 

46 



quiet — as meek as 
can be. Freshman 
terpiece this year in 
had a formative in- 
lege career by set- 
originality in enter- 
valuable also in 
own unity, which 
in evidence pre- 
as we were in the 
ments. 

Sophomore year, 
not, and knew not 




by any means destroyed, as Sophomore luncheon — the fete which 
our class established, testified. It was almost the first act on our ov n 
initiative, and encouraging in its success. 

With Junior year we had reached the stage where we " knew 
but knew not that we knew." And looking back over the year we 
cannot wonder at our lack of self-confidence, for the knowledge that 
we had was swallowed up in the innumerable volumes of what we 
were told we ought to know in order to be well-fitted for our work. 
Junior Prom marked the turning-point in our life. It was then that 
we put away childish things and began to assimilate some of the 
Seniors' dignity — in other words, we began to grow up. 

And now, as Seniors, we " know, and know that we know," not 
with a boastful confidence in our powers, but with becoming humility, 
because we have a realizing sense at the same time of the vastness 
of the fields of knowledge still unknown to us. 




47 





HOUSEHOLD ECONOMICS 

Torrington, Connecticut 
Torrington High School 
Honor Committee, (2) 
Welcoming Committee, (3) 
Vesper Committee, (4) 

''Ha, Ha! The wooing o't ! " 



%I 




CWU I. OJlUr"'- 



LIBRARY SCIENCE 



Braintree, Massachusetts 
Thayer Academy, Braintree 

" Wisdom speaks little 

But that little well." 




HOUSEHOLD ECONOMICS 

Azusa, California 

Fryeburg Academy 

Cap and Gown Committee (4) 

Choir (3) 

Glee Club (3) 

" We are all born for love . . . 
It is the only principle of existence and its only end.' 



48 



YTt 



Oaj 



CWinJt>s 



SECRETARIAL STUDIES 

Newton Highlands, Massachusetts 
Insular Normal School of Puerto Rico 
Oberlin Academy, Oberlin, Ohio 
Honor Committee (2) 
Mandolin Club (1) (2) (4) 
Student Editor Simmons Quarterly (4) 
" Let none presume 

To wear an undeserved dignity.' 




%&*. (ju. & 



QAaaJLsQ^ 



SECRETARIAL STUDIES 



Belmont, Massachusetts 
Belmont High School 

" Was a lady such a lady, 

cheeks so round and lips so red.' 




r /(A 



^£ £. T&tAASUXl- 



HOUSEHOLD ECONOMICS 



Brattleboro, Vermont 

Brattleboro High School 

Boston School of Domestic Science 

Class Vice-president (2) 

Guild Flower Committee (4) 

" So mild, so merciful, so strong, so good. 
So patient, peaceful, loyal, loving, pure." 




49 




tyluu (fLlki 1 



' ^UiuOTj-SLty- 



SECRETARIAL STUDIES 



Brookline, Massachusetts 
Brookline High School 

: ' Zealous yet modest ; innocent though free ; 
Patient of toil, serene amidst alarms." 



LIBRARY SCIENCE 

Southbridge, Massachusetts 
Southbridge High School 
Basketball (3) 
Champion Interclass Meet (3) 

" / am resolved to grow fat 

And look young till forty.' 



:- ■.^-■■'^ 




^ 



--Ax^v-yvjUL. 



5.^UKk). 



LIBRARY SCIENCE 



Plymouth, Massachusetts 
Plymouth High School 

•' Good-humor only teaches charms to last, 
Still makes new conquests and maintains the part." 



50 



J 



\ 



-+. e 



0>J^ 



Q- — 



SOCIAL WORKERS 



Chicago, Illinois 
University of Chicago (i) 



1 She is complete in feature and in mind, 
With all good grace to grace a zvoman. 




LIBRARY SCIENCE 

Worcester, Massachusetts 
Worcester Classical High School 

'' For she is just the quiet kind 

whose natures never vary." 




P. 



Uyi/- 



i^l<ytAAa^UytA/J . 



HOUSEHOLD ECONOMICS 

Vancouver, British Columbia 
Minneapolis South High School 
Minnesota Agricultural School (i) (2) (3) 
Ohio State University (4) 

" The reason firm, the temperate will, 
Endurance, foresight, strength and skill.' 




51 




lAXa^cLn*$~%^\GJlsuj P63UJIM- 

HOUSEHOLD ECONOMICS 



Glens Falls, New York- 
Glens Falls High School 
Class Vice-president (3) 
Junior Dance Committee (3) 
Vice-president Guild (3) 
President Student Government 



(4) 



" The heart to receive, the understanding to direct 
or the hand to execute." 




Ai S&J&lle- olS^CW^ 



SECRETARIAL STUDIES 



Roxbury, Massachusetts 
Roxbury High School 

" There is great ability in knowing 
how to conceal one's ability." 




^o^uj E.^umA-. 



LIBRARY SCIENCE 



Altoona, Pennsylvania 
Altoona High School 
Basketball (3) 
Tennis Champion (3) 
Guild Treasurer (4) 



Life is too short 

for mean anxieties.' 



52 




SCHOOL OF SCIENCE 

Brookline, Massachusetts 
Brighton High School 
Guild Vice-president (3) 
Junior Dance Committee (3) 
Microcosm Board (4) 

" Strange fits of passion 
have I known." 




HOUSEHOLD ECONOMICS 

Helena, Montana 

Helena High School 

Montana State College (i) (2) (3) 

" It is in general more profitable to reckon 
up our defects than to boast of our attainments.' 




HOUSEHOLD ECONOMICS 



Providence, Rhode Island 
Providence English High 



' Ah, but a man's reach 

should exceed his grasp." 




53 




r-^xju jyk 3b 



SECRETARIAL STUDIES 

Brewster, Massachusetts 
Brewster High School 

"Dreams, ivhicn, beneath the hov'ring shades °f night 
Sport with the ever-restless minds of men." 




yypd^d l. g-A^^E. 



SECRETARIAL STUDIES 



Lynn, Massachusetts 
Lynn Classical High 
Glee Club (3) (4) 



" A great soul will be strong to live, 
as well as to think," 




Iaaa*J~^^&^^i s 



SECRETARIAL STUDIES 



Waltham, Massachusetts 
Waltham High School 
Glee Club (2) (3) (4) 
Senior Dance Committee (4) 



'She should never have looked at me 

if she meant I should not love her.' 



54 



SECRETARIAL STUDIES 

Melrose Highlands, Massachusetts 
Melrose High School 
Honor Committee (4) 

" Zeal and duty are not slow ; 

But on occasion's forelock watchful wait.' 




GJUfloU T. tic^k*^ 



SECRETARIAL STUDIES 

Portland, Maine 
Portland High School 
Microcosm Board (3) 

'■' Nothing has such power to broaden the mind 
as the ability to investigate systematically." 



ClIocjlJj. ^xaMXL 



SECRETARIAL STUDIES 



Southbridge, Massachusetts 
Southbridge High School 



"A woman's greatest poiver 
lies in serenity." 




55 




Unionville, Connecticut 
Wheaton Seminary 
Class Vice-president (i) 
Basketball (3) 
Editor-in-chief Microcosm (4) 

" / never dare to write 

As funny as I can." 



■TVijAvv. 





-cL. 



HOUSEHOLD EC0N0MFCS 



Portsmouth, New Hampshire 
Minneapolis High School 
University of Minnesota (1) (2) 

"Sleep brings dreams; and dreams are 
often most vivid and fantastical before we 
have yet been 'wholly lost in slumber." 




HOUSEHOLD ECONOMICS 

Dubuque, Iowa 
Dubuque High School 

■' For brevity is very good. 

Where we are. or are not understood.' 



56 












S^ =-ft 




At^*uKJL^ Y - ^rflt/W%U_ 



LIBRARY SCIENCE 

Cambridge, Massachusetts 
Brighton High School 
Junior Dance Committee (3) 
Tennis Committee (4) 
Music Committee (4) 
Microcosm Board (4) 

"Better late than never." 




HOUSEHOLD ECONOMICS 

Franklin, Vermont 

Burlington High School 

Class Ways and Means Committee (4) 

Glee Club (3) (4) 

" In her experience all her friends relied 
Heaven was her help and nature was her guide.' 




tla_sCaJUjl_ 



(XsU~E-~ 



LIBRARY SCIENCE 



Kingston, Massachusetts 
Kingston High School 



' But there's nothing half so sweet in life 
As love's young dream." 




57 




- f-y^^agelg&AK'Ag* 



^vvggg m • g ^p« ^5 |g| -va f 6|r$ |k« fej as-,- r^Sft- ■ . . 





Utats 7t?. <%l^£ 



HOUSEHOLD ECONOMICS 



Antrim, New Hampshire 
Antrim High School 



" / love tranquil solitude 
And such society 
As is quiet, wise and good." 




SECRETARIAL STUDIES 



W\t 



Dorchester, Massachusetts 
Girls' Latin School, Boston 
Glee Club 

•' Home. Sweet Home." 




^0 



VVe^-u-oCt^-iflL. 



SCHOOL OF SCIENCE 



Raynham, Massachusetts 
Taunton High School 
Bridgewater Normal School 



For science is, like virtue, 

its own exceeding great reward.' 



5« 




Albany, New York 
Albany Academy for Girls 
Microcosm Board (4) 



'' The mildest manners 

and the gentlest heart, 



a 



■p^t'c 



^y 




SCHOOL OF SCIENCE 



Gaysville, Vermont 
Dorchester High School 



' Deeming nothing to have been done 
if anything remained to do." 




SECRETARIAL STUDIES 

Allston, Massachusetts 
Framinghara High School 

•' 'To deny the freedom of the will 

is to make morality impossible. 




59 




HOUSEHOLD ECONOMICS 

Haverhill, Massachusetts 
Haverhill High School 
Manager Glee Club (4) 
Microcosm Board (4) 

" A young woman of a calm temper 
and modest deportment." 




SECRETARIAL STUDIES 

Boston, Massachusetts 

Horton Collegiate Academy, Nova Scotia 

Microcosm Board (4) 

"And, gentle in her manner, 

She does bold tilings in a quiet way.' 




CLxaAXZL 



/co^c^ 



LIBRARY SCIENCE 



Haverhill, Massachusetts 
Haverhill High School 
Class Treasurer (3) 
Class Vice-president (4) 



Those graceful acts 

Those thousand decencies that daily flow 

From all her words and actions.'' 



60 



werrovui CxuxA-a- 



LIBRARY SCIENCE 

Lexington, Massachusetts 
Lexington High School 
Class Junior Prom Committee (3) 
Guild Christmas Decorations (1) 
Guild Secretary (4) 

" Fashioned so slenderly, 

Young and so fair.' 




HOUSEHOLD ECONOMICS 

Glencarlyn, Virginia 
Washington High School 
Showcase Committee (2) (3) 
Honor Committee (1) (3) (4) 
Microcosm Board (4) 

"For nothing lovelier can be found 
In woman, than to study household good.' 




HOUSEHOLD ECONOMICS 

Holbrook, Massachusetts 
Thayer Academy 
Wellesley (1) (2) 

" There is as much eloquence in the tone 
of voice, in the eyes, and in the air of 
the speaker as in her choice of words." 




6l 




VL^ML C.&tiku 



O-cc^ 



LIBRARY SCIENCE 



Danvers. Massachusetts 
holton High School 
Basketball (3) 

" In her alone . 

'twas natural to please." 




L^ajzJUj^ \ VJL2^_ 



SECHETAKI.1L studies 

yilfcrcl. New Hampshire 

Newton High School 

Vice-president Student Government (4) 

President Guild (4) 

Glee Club (1) (2) (3) (4) 

" True as the needle to the pole, 
or as the dial to the sun." 




o- 



j^j~s< 



iA^^w,, 



HOUSEHOLD ECONOMICS 



Hartford, Connecticut 
Hartfcrd High School 



" Cookery is become an art, 
a noble science." 



62 



-^^uJlT^.S*-^ 



SECRETARIAL^ STUDIES 



Cambridge, Massachusetts 
Cambridge Latin School 



"For truth has such a face and such- a mien 
As to be lov'd needs only to be seen." 




\ )U>iJLM.<-t~ \ • Q 



QA. 




SCHOOL OF SCIENCE 

Dorchester, Massachusetts 
Dorchester High School 

" / value science — none can prise it more, 
It gives ten thousand motives to adore; 
Be it religions as it ought to be 
The heart it humbles and it bows the knee." 




Yy<jOj±dkx^iz. k . $> c^Pttr 



SECRETARIAL STUDIES 



Springfield, Massachusetts 
Springfield High School 
Junior Dance Committee (3) 
Class Day Committee (4) 
Basketball (3) 



One thing is forever good: 

That one thing is success." 




63 



/sag 



-T?K;.«jMC'.»i2 



rf& Sly] in 





\\lU^ >Tb. SlcuJe. 



SECRETARIAL STUDIES 

North Arlington, Massachusetts 

Arlington High School 

Basketball (3) 

Mandolin Club (4) 

Executive Board S. A. A. (4) 

"' Glad, but not flushed 
with gladness." 




TVLA/LyU^ 



frtttibliMA*. 



HOUSEHOLD ECONOMICS 

West Roxbury, Massachusetts 
West Roxbury High School 
Junior Prom Committee (3) 

" She's calm, deliberate, 

dignified, leisurely." 




hAa^caj 



a 




HOUSEHOLD ECONOMICS 



Rockland, Massachusetts 

Rockland High School 

Secretary Student Government (3) 

"A kind and gentle heart she has.' 



64 



LIBRAEY SCIENCE 

Somersworth, New Hampshire 

Haverhill High School 

Executive Committee Class (i) (4) 

Class Secretary (2) 

Junior Prom Committee (3) 

" / liave marked 

A thousand blushing apparitions 
To start into her face." 




SCHOOL OF SCIENCE 

Dorchester, Massachusetts 

Dorchester High School 

Class Ways and Means Committee (3) (4) 

" Her wit was more than man, 
her innocence a child." 





UL 



V /tt^t^vi-i-^ 



SECRETARIAL STUDIES 



Waltham, Massachusetts 
Waltham High School 
Class Secretary (4) 
Guild Vice-president (3) 
Glee Club (2) (3) (4) 



" / love to be merry and wise, 

To laugh and cajole with a friend.' 




65 




SECRETARIAL STUDIES 



Roslindale, Massachusetts 
West Roxury High School 



"Listened perhaps 

but never talked at all." 




SECRETARIAL STUDIES 

Dedham, Massachusetts 
Dedham High School 
Tennis Team (2) (3) (4) 

" A strong and healthy soil of common sense — 
Freshened by living springs of feeling.' 




HOUSEHOLD ECONOMICS 

Oakland, California 

High School, Rockland, Maine. 

Honor Committee (4) 

" Thrifty and thoughtful of others.' 



66 



r~* 




Roslindale, Massachusetts 
West Roxbury High School 
Honor Committee (4) 
Mandolin Club (2) (4) 

" The reward of one duty 

is the power to fulfill another. 



£J^* 



: #^& 



CLsr-yz^£s. 



SECRETARIAL STUDIES 

Dorchester, Massachusetts 
Girls High School, Boston 
Class Treasurer (4) 

"Never idle a moment.'' 




t^CfccU/OcV"/ 



^0-<^O62y 



HOUSEHOLD ECONOMICS 

Grand Rapids, Michigan 
Grand Rapids High School 
Class Secretary ( 3) 
Class President (4) 
Welcoming Committee (4) 

" Of ready tact 

and nimble wit." 




67 











VijciiiLAA Uj-«--o--<1juu^^4 



SECRETARIAL STUDIES 

Lexington, Massachusetts 
Lexington High School 
Uass President (i) 
Executive Committee (2) (4) 
Honor Committee (3) 

" Neat but not finical, 

Sage, but not cynical.' 




fe A-S^ 



: ik 




14: ^«** 




68 



Cto of ~<***W 1912 



(^fftcers 



IDA E. ADAMS 

President 

HILDA HOUGH HARRIET M. BOSWORTH 

Vice-President Secretary 

VIOLA J. ANDERSON 

Treasurer 



7i 



1912-cijr aaugof 2Ltfc 




HREE years of college life our class has lived. Three 
years of study, pleasure, and steady purpose. Like the 
Orientals we have all worked together on the " Rug of 
Life." We hold it up for all to see, dark colors and 
gay, the true design, and the unfinished border of blue and gold — 
our Senior year. Then you may see it hung in entirety upon the 
beloved walls of our Alma Mater. Would you read? Behold here 
are the tales written in picture. 

Our Freshman year. A panel alive with merry figures done on 
a background of ocean blue and the yellow brown of the rocks at 
Marblehead. This is the Sophomore picnic for the Freshmen of 1908-09. 
Beside it an oblique glimpse of Innocents in an apprehensive gathering. 
But fear not. It is only a small portrayal of the Freshmen called 
to a Dean's meeting where they were impressively presented with a 
ten-pound box of candy by the Juniors. Beyond you see children in 
gay attire, a pretty sight — the Senior baby party for the incoming 
class. At one side a group in indecision as to the naming of the class 
elephant, and beneath, in French, the " Sal et Lieu." Around these 
three panels in the wreaths of holly such as we hung in chapel for 
the Christmas service are harlequin figures and happy-go-lucky scenes 
of the class party, the Freshman Circus. These are the fantastic 
scenes of one-third of our masterpiece. 

The second section is significant of our second year. Regard 
with veneration the depth of color, the vigor of touch, the sincerity 
of the whole in contrast to the gaiety of the rioting scenes which we 
have just viewed. The Freshmen of 1909 we entertained with readings, 
after which we danced. The entertainment in honor of the Senior 
class of 1910, as well as our Sophomore class luncheon, were 



72 



indefinitely postponed because of the Scarlet Fever vacation. There- 
fore two blank panels of vermilion. The border, a thread of gold, 
is tbe honor of winning the Interclass Tennis championship in which 
Elinor Whitney of our class was the victor. Let ns pass on. 

This third section before which we now stand is woven in much 
the same colors as the previous section, but being new they are fresher 
and brighter, except for the tender, symbolic tribute in memory of 
Lucy Fritch. The panel in which is depicted the scenes of our 
masquerade for the Freshmen is full of jollity, figures in motion done 
in riotous colors. Close beside it is a plain, glowing panel on which 
is inscribed " S. A. A." To us comes the honor of claiming the first 
president of the Simmons Athletic Association, Caroline Aldrich. A 
small scmare now attracts our attention, the tea given by the Juniors 
of South Hall in honor of our president, Ida Adams. Close to the 
unfinished edge are the scenes of the Junior Prom. The graceful 
beauty of the dance is woven in yellow and white. About the main 
scene are small wreaths of flowers in which you see the charming illus- 
trations of the candy sales, the Dutch dance, the chemistry party, and 
glimpses of the ice cream sales in the Halls at night, — all alive with 
the spirit of successful venture, good fellowship, and the anticipation 
of the Prom. 

This is all. You have little time to see now how strong are the 
loose ends of the sturdy warp, but you will return to admire our 
" Rug of Life " finished, at the end of our Senior year. 



\ 



Ml ' 




73 




ADAMS, IDA E. 
AKERS, FAYTHE M. 
ALDRICH, CAROLINE E. 
ALLEN, ELSIE R. 
AMERY, ELIZABETH L. 
ANDERSON, VIOLA J. 
ANTIN, IDA D. 
BABCOCK, FLORENCE K. 
BASSET, ELSIE L. 
BECKER, MARGARET E. 
BLANCHARD, GLADYS H. 
BOSWORTH, HARRIET M. 
BOUGHTON, HELEN E. 
BOWEN, MILDRED 
BOWERS, CANEMA 
BURPEE, DOROTHY G. 
BURROUGHS, OLIVE C. 
CHARLTON, ALICE 
CLEMENT, JENNIE P. 
COLE, ELEANOR 
CONVERSE, ELSIE E. 
COTTER, SALLY 
CURTIS, HELEN M. 
CUTTER, RACHAEL H. 
DENNISON, ANNE 
DUNN, MARION J. 
EVELETH, LDCY M. 
FARRALL, HORTENSIA A. 
FLINT, MARGARET 



FOSTER, MARJORfE L. 

french, olive 
galarneau, aldina a. 
gegenheimer, vida 
gross, rebecca s. 
harris, helen r. 
hawkes, m. florence 
henderson, marie e. 
holmes, d. margaret 
horton, helen k. 
hough, hilda 
jacobs, flora m. 
libby, viola e. 
loring, marion 
ludden, daisy g. 
lyle, susan a. 
Mccormick, daisy i. 
magee, mabel a. 
merrick, miriam 
moses, dora w. 
murphy, katharine 
nissen, louise b. 
norton, helen f. 
ocheltree, margaret 
penney, clara 
philbrick, bernice l. 
pitman, h. julia 
plympton, ruth 
pratt, catharine 



PRICE, CHRISTINE 
REED, E. ALBERTA 
aICHARDSON, ELSA L. 
ROCK, ELIABETH F. 
ROLLINS, ETHEL V. 
SHEEHAN, ALICE A. 
SMITH, MIRIAM S. 
SPAULDING, HELEN C. 
SPRINGFIELD, ELIZABETH L. 
STEPHENS, ALICE G. 
SULLIVAN, GERTRUDE M. 
SWETT, OLIVE 
TALBOT, MARY L. 
TAYLOR, MILDRED J. 
THISSEL, MARTHA S. 
THOMAS, MARJORIE F. 
THORNTON, F. ANNIE 
TRUE, GLENNA M. 
TURNER, HAZEL M. 
TUTTLE, DOROTHY M. 
WATSON, MARY 
WHITCOMB, MARY N. 
WHITING, AMY 
WHITNEY, ELINOR 
WILSON, EUGENIA 
WOOD, BEULAH 
WOOD, ELLEN C. 



74 



'wnomm 




CRYSTAL GAZl/NG 




Clae® of 1913 



Officers 



HELEN C. AGATE 

President 

MARION S. DONALDSON MARIE W. GURDY 

Vice-President Secretary 

MARION S. WILLIAMS 
Treasurer 



77 



opliomorf Ht0torp 

Nineteen Cliirtccn'g CJjtlDliooD 



" Until one is a Junior, one is a child." 

In the Fenway, near the Palace, 
By the hanks of Muddy River, 
Stands the mighty Simmons College, 
Pride of Boston, Simmons College. 
Dark hehind it looms the Great Dump, 
Looms the insalubrious ash-heap, 
Looms the grandest dump in Boston; 
Close before it flows the river, 
Flows the black and sluggish river, 
Flows the sinuous Muddy River. 

Here the tolerant, calm instructors 
Met the class of Nineteen-Thirteen, 
Introduced them to their classes, 
Made them sit upon the hard seats 
While they lectured to them grimly, 
Lectured to them for a whole year; 
Stilled their wild complaints by saying, 
" Hush ! Be still, or we shall flunk you ! " 
For a year they did in this wise. 

Then when Spring came, and the sparrows 
Caroled sweetly in the Fenway, 
When the papers in the Great Dump 
Flew like wild ducks clear to Brookline, 
Then they held long privy meetings, 
Calculated and considered, 
And Exams were brought to being — 
Finals, where the marks are final. 
These were days of fear and trembling, 

78 




Days of horror and of anguish, 

Days which seemed like one long nightmare. 

But the class of Nineteen-Thirteen 

Was a class of grit and spirit, 

Was a class with wild ambitions; 

So they passed examinations, 

Passed, and cried aloud in triumph, 

Passed, and loved themselves for passing, 

And behold! It made them Sophomores. 

Back thej r came next year to College, 
Back to Simmons, pride of Boston, 
Greeted lovingly the Seniors 
(Whom they secretly think specious) 
Said good morning to the C. G.'s, 
To the desiccated C. G.'s; 
Looked resentment at the Juniors, 
For the Juniors are insidious, 
And last year were rather brutal; 
Gazed with scorn upon the Freshmen, 
On the smart and garrulous Freshmen, 
For the Freshmen, in their freshness, 
Show crass ignorance of all things. 
They should be suppressed at all times, 
And their mouths be incerated. 

Thus '13 returned to College, 
And this year has been most happy, 
Has established them at Simmons, 
Has made sure their high position. 
But they could not keep together, 
Could not meet in mutual classes, 
Could not have the same instructors; 
For they all took different courses, 
All took new and awful subjects. 
Friend was snatched from friend most calmly, 
Brother taken from brother rudely, 
Yet the class remained a unit. 

79 



r£=* 




They have had no entertainments, 
Have not given foolish class-teas, 
Have not spent vast hoards of money, 
— Chiefly 'cause they didn't have it. 
Chiefly 'cause they couldn't get it, 
For the class-dues were a dollar, 
And the Hetty Greens at Simmons, 
(Also any greens at Simmons, 
Anj T style or kind of " long greens ") 
Are as scarce as snow in Summer, 
And as hard to keep in Boston. 

They have worked this year at Simmons, 
They have labored, and they did it 
Just to be experimental, 
Just to see how long they'd stand it, 
Just to see what working felt like; 
And they found it rather pleasant, 
Were surprised that they could do it. 
(The instructors, too, felt likewise.) 
That is why they have been quiet, 
Why they have not entertained much; 
They have all had much to bother, 
Many things have taken spare time, 
Snatched and eaten up their spare time : 

All the girls in Library Science 
Spend their spare time down at Bates Hall, 
Beading twenty miles of printing, 
Waiting forty hours for two books, 
Looking up ungodly questions, 
Cataloguing, cataloguing, 
Dying, but still cataloguing. 

And the Secretarial students 
Work till 1 a.m. on Sundays, 
Learning word-signs by the hundred. 
Twice a day they learn them over, 

80 



Lest a one should be forgotten, 

Lest a single one feel slighted. 

And they typewrite all their spare time, 

Waste whole reams of costly paper, 

Waste terse language, most artistic, 

For no Remington is worth it, 

— One respects a thing one curses. 

And the Household Ec. girls also — 
They have much to do in spare time, 
They must all employ their spare time, 
For their cooking must be decent, 
Lab. work never can be slighted. 
If a garment does not fit them, 
They may subtly stretch on tip-toe 
That the gown may seem the right length, 
That the hanging may seem even; 
But if both sleeves are for one arm, 
If both sleeves are cut for one arm, 
They cannot reverse their shoulders, 
Nor yet dislocate a fore-arm, 
So they manufacture new sleeves, 
So they have to use their spare-time, 
(Also spare cloth, and spare coppers) 
So they have not entertained much. 
'Tis a cruel world we live in. 

But in spite of all these troubles, 
They are different from the others, 
Vastly different from the others. 
For they show politeness always, 
Are a joy to their instructors, 
Have propensities for kindness, 

- Special kindness toward the Freshman. 
And, lest you should doubt this kindness, 
Listen ye, who said ye doubted: 

Twice and thrice, in games of cunning, 
Games of skill and swift of action, 

81 



— Basketball the Great, is this game, 
They have let the Freshmen beat them, 
Let the Freshmen trample on them, 
Let the Freshmen soar above them; 
They have done this out of kindness, 
Out of kindness to the children, 
Eleemosynary kindness, 
That they may not be disheartened, 
That they may not grow discouraged, 
That they may not feel downtrodden. 

Truly are the Sophomores noble, 
Great of heart and grand of nature. 
They shall honor Simmons College, 
Honor all who ever knew them; 
Freshmen, pattern on the Sophomores, 
Do ye always just as they do, 
Grin, and never mind a failure, 
Grin, and just be glad you're living 
And your lives will be successful, 
For success in life is gladness. 




82 



Class of 1913 



AGATE, HELEN G. 
ALMY, HELEN 
ANNIS, MARJOR1E 
AVER, DORIS L. 
BABCOCK, CLARISSA G. 
rtAKER, F. JOSEPHINE 
BAKER, MARY E. 
BARK, MARGARET E. 
BATCHELDER, OLIVE E. 
BELL, DOROTHY 
RIERMAN, ETHEL 
BIGELOW, DOROTHY 
BLAKE, DOROTHY 
BOEHMKE, HELENE A. 
BUTTRiCK, MARION 
CASHMAN, RITA 
CASTEELS, LUCY 
CARPENTER, MARGARET 
CAS Vv ELL, EDNA 
CHAMBERLAIN, MARY E. 
CHAPIN, ESTHER G. 
CLARKE, MAZELLE L. 
COLE, ELEANOR 
COMBE, HILDA A. 
CURRY, MARCELLA C. 
DAY, ELIZABETH H. 
DIALL, OLIVE E. 
DONALDSON, MARION S. 
DOUGLAS, WINIFRED 
DUTTON, MARY C. 
FAHRINGER, REBECCA M. 



FERNALD, MARION F. 
FORSTER, MARGARET B. 
FOWLE, J. EDNA 
FREDERICK, KATHERINE M. 
GALLAGHER, ALICE R. 
GIBBONS, IRENE N. 
GLESSNER, HAZEL G. 
GODDARD, MARJORIE A. 
GOLDSMITH, A. FLORENCE 
GURDY, MARIc W. 
HALL, FLORA E. 
HAMLIN, HELEN B. 
HATHAWAP, MAROE E. 
HAWES. RUTH 
HENDERSON, MARIE E. 
HINCHCLIFFE, JEANETTE B. 
HOLDER, KATHRYN 
HOOKWAY, MARION 
HUBBARD, RUTH N. 
HUGHITT, DOROTHY W. 
INGALLS, RUTH E. 
IRWIN, HAZEL A. 
JOHNSON, FLORENCE P. 
JOHNSTON, LAURA E. 
KEELER, MARION 
KELLAWAY, ELSIE M. 
KELLY, ANNA T. 
KELLY, HELEN M. 
KING, GEORGIA A. 
KNEIL, MARGARET M. 
LANE, FLORENCE 



LEONARD, AMY L. 
LEVY, FLORENCE 
LIBBEY, MARTHA J. 
MACARDELL, EDITH C. 
McDUFF, BLANCHE G. 
McGURK, KATHERINE L. 
McKEE, HALLIE 
McINTYRE, HELEN C. 
MANDELSTAM, GERTRUDE 
MEEHAN, LINA 
MERCER, IRENE B. 
MOSES, FLORENCE 
NILES, MARGARFT H. 
NORMAN, RUTH 
PARADISE, DOROTHEA C. 
PARKER, MARGARET L. 
PARMENTER, ABBY H. 
PARSONS, EDITH N. 
PEARSON, MATTIE E. 
PECK, LILLIE M. 
PELLMAN, JEANNETTE E. 
PETTENGiLL, MABEL D. 
PINKS, VERA L. 
PLAT'lo, ELIZABETH F. 
PLYMPTON, RUTH H. 
PORTER, ANNABEL 
RATHBUN, BERTHA M. 
RINE, ROSINA E. P. 
ROBB1NS, ESTHER M. 
ROBINSON, HARRIET 
ROSE, ELLA J. 



83 



ST. CLAIR, SADIE 
SAMPSON, ANNIE H. 
SCOTT, MARY S. 
SHEPHARD, HANNAH B. 
SILVER, MARGARET D. 
SPEAR. MABEL A. 
SQUIRE, CAROLINE E. 
STARRETT, MILDRED H. 
STERLING, ANNA M. 



STEVENS, JULIA F. 
SULLIVAN, HELEN F. 
SUMNER, LYDIA W. 
SWANBURG. NELLIE B. 
SWEET. OLIVE A. 
SYMONDS, ESTHER M. 
TERRELL, INEZ 
THURSTON, ELIZABETH 
TROW, MADGE F. 



tyacke, Dorothy 
'valker, elizabeth m. 
weed, h. irene 
wells, edna a. 
wilber, doris e. 
williams, marion s. 
woodward, emily e. 



&!^-#^#K 



■V::-:.'i--Wv:-:^^.>^V:: , .-^-.v.'- 




8 4 



Class of 




1914 



(^fftccrs 



ELSIE BARNES 
President 



HELEN M. ANDERSON 

Vice-President 



KATHARINE TORREY 

Secretary 



BARRARA WALKER 

Treasurer 



87 



Cta %)iQtovv, 1914 

2 d3ltmp0c into tljc jttcmor? TBooU of a freeman 




F you are really interested in the history of the Freshman 
class, I will show you my memory book, with its 
souvenirs of my Freshman year. 

These first pictures are of the College buildings, and 
from them you can easily imagine what my first impressions of 
Simmons were. Oh, those first few days! That first dinner! How 
we longed for the familiar places and people that we had been so 
eager to leave, only a few hours ago, for the excitement of College 
Life. For the first few days we wandered aimlessly about, handing 
in enrollment cards, and rushing up and down stairs in a frantic 
effort to find room 114, and be on time. We didn't have to wait long 
for one of those exams which we have learned to dread. The very 
first Saturday we were requested to take an Arithmetic exam if we 
intended to enroll in certain courses. We managed to live through 
it all right, and waited eagerly to see what would happen next. 

This picture? Why this is Library B where our class was called 
together for the first time. Here we met the Dean, about whom we 
had heard so much. She welcomed us in such a charming manner, 
and gave us such an encouraging talk, that we were glad we had 
decided to come to Simmons. She assured us that the College couldn't 
get along without us, and as a proof of this she told us that it was 
our duty and privilege to decorate the chapel for the Christmas 
service. We were very much interested in the Chapel, and decorated 
it to the best of our ability (and finances). 

Ah, this important-looking blue book! It reminds me of the 
first day when we were presented with these as we were going out 
the door. We read them over and over for fear we should break 

88 



some rule or miss something. Through these little hooks we began 
to understand the mysteries of the Honor System. When we had 
been asked to vote upon the Honor System we considered ourselves 
recognized as a class, and accepted as true members of the College. 
We settled down to work, as soon as we had recovered somewhat 
from the newness of it all, and soon discovered that we really had 
to work hard if we intended to stay long. When our marks for the 
first weeks came out, November eleventh, we were ready to agree 
with some upper classmen who had told us we would study day and 
night if we really did all that we were supposed to do. Nevertheless, 
having learned just how much we could let slip, we were well started 
on our first year at college. 

You want to know who these girls arc, do you? They are our 
four class officers. We had quite an exciting class meeting, because 
you know we were so little acquainted with our classmates that we 
were almost voting for names, not people. Some kind spirit must 
have guided us, however, because we are very much pleased with 
our choice, now that we know the girls better. 

Yes, we really had a dance, with orders too, but " no man allowed." 
It was given in honor of the Freshmen by the Student Government 
people. Each Freshman was taken by an upper classman, and was 
given a great time. We had much difficulty, however, in distinguishing 
upper class girls from Freshmen. Perhaps we unintentionally made 
a few unpardonable mistakes, but how were we to know? 

This is a souvenir of the reception and dance given us by the 
Student Guild. By this time we were somewhat acquainted, and used 
to " girl-dances." The long receiving line had no terrors for us, 
because we had already met the President and the Dean. Our next 
red letter day was the Senior party for the Freshmen. This certainly 
was clever. There we saw ourselves as others saw us in all our green- 
ness. We also saw the dreaded " mid-years " personified in the shape 
of a huge, ugly monster, which proved to be no worse than the real 

89 



thing. That mask? Oh yes, that is to remind ns of the good time 
we had at the masquerade the Juniors gave us. We were certainly 
well treated by everyone, and we appreciate the parties given in our 
honor. 

Oh those " mid-years! " How well we remember them! We heard 
of them almost the first of the year, and continued to hear of them 
occasionally until nearly time for them. Then that was all we did 
hear, " mid-years " — " mid-years " — " mid-years." If, as Wordsworth 
says, " poetry is the spontaneous overflow of powerful feeling," no 
wonder people had to write poems on the terrors of " mid-years " to 
relieve their feelings. Probably someone felt a great deal better after 
she had written these lines: 

What is it makes my hair grow white? 

Mid-year examinations. 
Why is it I can't sleep at night? 

Mid-year examinations. 
Why is it that I've grown so thin — 

That I'm no bigger than a pin? 
What makes me wish I'd better been? 

Mid-year examinations. 

Then we began to " bone," and kept it up steadily until the exams 
came. And then they were as hard as we expected. Somehow we 
lived through it, how we do not know. Fortunately there is an end 
to everything, and so they are over, and we are on our way to our 
" finals." 

With this horrible picture of " mid-years," we will close the book 
to open it again when our class has lost some of its overconfidence, and 
is ready to greet the Freshmen of 1915, whom we hope to welcome 
ns kindly as we were welcomed upon our arrival. 



90 




ABBOTT, GLADYS L. 
ANDERSON, HELEN M. 
ANDREWS, MARION 
ASHLEY, ROSAMOND W. 
ATKINS, HELEN G. 
ATKINSON, MILDRED 
ATWOOD, HORTENSE F. 
AURACHER, VIRNA K. 
AYER, DORIS L. 
BAILEY, MARTHA P. 
BAKER, GERTRUDE F. 
BARKER. RUTH S. 
BARNES, ELSIE 
BARTLETT, EDITH J. 
3ART0, MARJORIE I. 
BASSETT, AVA S. 
BASSETT, INEZ E. 
BATES. MILDRED L. 
BEALER, ELIZABETH R. 
BEAMISH, GWENDOLYN S. 
BEETLE, CLARA 
_LL, DOROTHY 
BELL, LUCY S. 
BIERMAN, ETHEL I. 
BLAISDELL, HAZEL E. 
BOLLES, FLORENCE I. 
BOWEN, RUTH P. 
BOYD, HELEN J. 
BRAINARD, MARJORIE W. 



BRAY, FLORENCE A. 
BROWN, EDITH 
BROWN, LYDIA G. 
BURD, SUSAN W. 
BURDICK, MARGARET F. 
BUTTERFIELD, CATHERINE 
l UTTERS, MARION 
CABOT, HELEN L. 
CANADA, KATHERINE 
CANNON, ELSIE P. 
CARLETON, HELEN F. 
CARR, LENA F. 
CARTER, BERTHA M. 
CASNEAU, PEARL E. 
L HANDLER, MAE F. 
CHRISTMAN, CARMEDA M. 
^LARK, ALICE W. 
CLARK, ANITA Q. 
CLEMENT, LOUISE M. 
COLTON, OLIVE M. 
CONNOR, ETHEL B. 
CORNELL, JENNIE H. 
CRAWFORD, CORA A. 
CROSBY, HELEN E. 
CROSBY. MARY L. 
CROWELL, JENNIE O. 
DARLING, CARRIE M. 
DAVIS, ANNA E. 
DAVIS, AMNA J. 



DAVIS, C. THISTLE 
UAVTS, FLORENCE J. 
DAVIS, IDA M. 
DAVOL, DOROTHY 
DEMPSEY, LILLIAN B. 
DIMICK, MILDRED E. 
DINEEN, MARY D. 
DOHERTY, MARY A. 
DOYLE, AGNES T. 
DUNNING, FRANCES M. 
DURGIN, MARY G. 
ELA, ELIZABETH P. 
ELLIS, ELIZABETH B. 
ELLIS, MYRTLE V. 
ENRIGHT, MARY T. 
ESSERS, CLARA 
EVERETT, MARY L. 
FALL, KATHARINE 
FARNHAM, HELEN M. 
FARRELL, GRACE E. 
FLANDERS, CLARA M. 
FLOYD, ABBIE P. 
FOLLWELL, VIOLET G. 
FORD, GERTRUDE 
GAINES, JOSEPHINE Z. 
GALLAGHER, ELIZABETH F. 
GALLANT, FLORENCE B. 
CARTLAND, AGNES C. 
GASPEY, ETTA M. 



91 



GAY, THIRZA ri. 
GILL, ALICE K. 
GILL, LUCIA A. 
GILMORE, MARION S. 
GIROUX, MARIE M. 
GODDARD, GLADYS A. 
GORE, DOROTHY R. 
GRANTHAM, FAYE B. 
GREENE, MARIAN W. 
HALE, HAZEL 
HALLGREEN, RUTH G. 
HANSON, MABEL L. 
HARDMAN, ELIZABETH U. 
HARDY, LOUISA H. 
HARRIS, KATHARINE 
HARTNESS, ANNA J. 
^ARTSHORN, aLICE M. 
HATCH, AGNES V. 
HAYES, DORIS C. 
HAYEb, MARIE L. 
HENRY, C. MERNA 
HILLYER, ANNIE L. 
t Oli^MEYER, MARGARET M. 
HODGDON, GLADYS 
HOLDEN, EVELYN 
HOOVER, MARY L. 
HOPKINS, HENRIETTA 
HORN, SUSAN 
HUGHITT, FRANCES S. 
HURLEY, mlLDRED T. 
HUTCHINSON, MARY U. 
iMRIE, ISABELLA A. 
JOHNSON, FLORENCE B. 



jones, marion d. 
jones, marguerite r. 
josey, josephine 
raster, nellie n. 
kennedy, ednah e. 
kimball, gladys a. 
kimball, lucy f. 
klein, ruth b. 
lane, florence m. 
lane, frances o. 
laurin, nina 
lawrence, lillian m. 
lee, helen a. 
levy, florence 
libby, norma l. 
liesveld, h. margaret 
livingston, carolyn g. 
logan, grace d. 
longfellow, jean g. 
lowell, dorothy f. 
lucas, mabel e. 
McCarthy, mary a. 

MacDONALD, CHARLOTTE P. 
MacKAY, HELEN G. 
McKENNA, ADELAIDE S. 
McRORY, MARY B. 
MAHANEY, GERTRUDE E. 
MARRINAN, MARY M. 
MARTIN, MARJORIE H. 
MASSON, ANNIE 
MATHEWS, HARRIET 
MILLER, RUTH S. 
MILLS, ELSIE C. 



MOORE, ANNIE M. 
MORGAN, nvELYN C. 
MUELLER, PAULA F. 
MURPHY, ELSIE R. 
NASH, MARY L. 
NEIDE, GLADYS B. 
NICKERSON, BERTHA 
NICKERSON, EMMA L. 
NICKERSON, MORA E. 
NISBET, LILLIAN F. 
NORMAN, RUTH E. 
O'BRIEN, MARY A. 
O'HAYRE, MARY 
OSTRANDER, MARION Y. 
PAGE, MARGARET E. 
PARKER, RUTH H. 
PARMLEY, MARJORIE 
PEARSON, DOROTHY 
PECKHAM, RUTH E. 
PEIRSON, JOSEPHINE W. 
PENFIELD, CORNELIA S. 
PENNOCK, HELEN K. 
PERLEY, LAURA M. 
PERRY, EDJNA E. 
PERRY, JOSEPHINE C. 
PICKERING, MARY H. 
PIERCE, IRMA J. 
PINNOCK, LORNA 
PLUMMER, ELIZABETH C. 
POLLOCK, FLORA M. 
POOLE, BLANCHE 
POORE, EMMA F. 
POORE, MARGUERITE 



92 



POTTER, MARGARET A. 
PURDY, HARRIET H. 
RANDALL, IONA M. 
RAYMOND, LELIA 
REAMY, H. ETHEL 
REID, CHARLOTTE E. 
RICE, THELMA 
RICHARDSON, EDITH F. 
RICHMOND, EVA 
RIDLEY, CONSTANCE J. 
ROBBINS, PHOEBE C. 
ROGERS, HARRIET E. 
ROUNDY. RUTH A. 
RUSSELL, DOROTHY 
SACKETT, REoiiCCA S. 
SALISBURY, H. EDITH 
SARGENT, CLARA S. 
SARGENT, SEOLA F. 
SCHUERCH, MARION 
SEAVER, ETHEL M. 
SHARP, MARJORIE M. 
SHAW, IMOGENE G. 



SHEPHERD, ETHEL M. 
SHEPHERD, SARA I. 
SILSBY, MILDRED P. 
SIMMONS, THEODORA 
SMALL, MARIOin L. 
SMITH, GERikUDE W. 
SMITH, HELEN J. 
SMITH, MARJORY M. 
SMITH, MARJORIE G. 
SPRING, HELEN N. 
STAPLES, MILDRED B. 
STEELE, KATHRYN N. 
STEPHENS, DOROTHY R. 
STOTT, MARGUERITE 
STREETER, FLORENCE A. 
STRICKLAND, EDNA H. 
STROHECKER, HELEN A. 
SUTCLIFFE, MARJORIE 
SUTHERLAND, MARGARET I. 
TAISEY, AGNES L. 
TAYLOR, AMANDA M. 
THOMAS, GRACE M. 



THOMAS, KATHARINE J. 
TIBBETTS, NORMA 
TORREY, KATHARINE 
TRAIN, CONSTANCE 
TRAPHAGEN, DOROTHY 
TURNER, MARY L. 
UPTON, FRANCES E. 
WADLIN, MABEL E. 
WAGNER, JANE L. 
WALKER, BARBARA 
WARREN, KATHERINE 
WASHBURN, MARTHA S. 
WELLS, KATHARYIn W. 
WETHERELL, ESTHER L. 
WHIPPLE, LAURA A. 
WHITING, RUTH K. 
WHITNEY, SARAH F. 
WOODMAN, ERMA E. 
WOODWARD, GERALDINE M. 
YOUNG, MARTHA E. 




93 



pccials 



ANDREWS, ELIZABETH E. 
ANDREWS, KATHARINE D. 
ASHENDEN, CONSTANCE 
ASHTON, MABEL F. 
BAGSTAD, a ! NNA E., Ph.B. 
BAILEY, NELLIE E. 
BARTON, MARY E. 
BELCHER, STELLA A. 
BENNETT, ADDlE F. 
BERNHEIMER, MARJORIE S. 
BLISS, ANNA E. 
BRADLEY, ROSAMOND 
BRAINARD, CAROLYN C. 
BRAMHALL, ROBERTA 
BRISTOL, ADA E. 
BRISTOL, JENNIE H. 
BROCKMAN, LOUISE 
BROWN, ISABEL C, A.B. 
BULKELEY, GRACE L. 
BURCHARD, ANNA L. 
BURGESS, ELIZABETH 
BURNHAM, GRACE M. 
BYRNE, MARl S. 
CAREY, MARIE K. 
CHADDERTON, CHARLOTTE 
CHASE, SUSAN E. 
CHICK, CLARA M. 
CLARK, EVELYN 
^LARKE, ELVA E. 



COOK, EMILY M. 
CORBIN, LEILA F. 
COX, ERNESTINE Y. 
COX, LUCY F. 
CROCKER, ADDIE A. 
CUMMINGS, EVELYN 
DAVIS, ESTHER K. 
DAVIS, MARTHA H. 
DEAN, MARY S. 
DORING, LAURA L. 
DOWNER, MARY L. 
EATO^, HELEN L. 
EDDY, HELEN A. 
EKSTRAND, CONSTANCE G. 
ELLS, MARIE C. 
ERSKINE, CARRIE E. 
FEHMER, LILLIAN E. 
FITZ, EDITH 
FOLEY, SARAH L. 
FRANK, MAY C. 
GATEWOOD, EMILY N. 
GILKEY, GRACE A. 
GILL, MARY F. 
GILSON, MARY B., A.B. 
GODDARD, MIRIAM 
GOODRICH, ELIZABETH M. 
GOSNELL, PEARL B. 
GRANT, PEARL A. 
GREEN, HELEN L., A.B. 



grimes, anna c. 
groce, clara s. 
guinasso, amelia 
hadley, mary l. 
" t ale, cecilia m. 
hardy, mary t. 
harris, harriett e. 
hatch, harriet h. 
hatch, marv e. 
henry, martha w. 
herron, katharine w. 
house, mary s. 
howe. Edith 
howland, lucy w. 
hunt, audrey l. 
hunter, ella w. 
jones, etta 
jondan, edna a. 
raster, m. louise 
kebler, emma a. 
king, sarah e. 
laird, eleanor m., a.b. 
leucher, charlotte m. 
lowe, harriet c. 
lundberg, marie g. 
mabley, grace e. 
macarow, jessie k. 

MacAUSLAND, LULU, A.B. 
McCLELLAN, ETHEL S. 



94 






rasflsrass? 





-y- " 



McDERMOTT, ALBERTA L. 
McGRATH, M. ELYSABETH 
McKAY, ELSIE 
MACLEOD, HELEN 
MELLEN, MARGARET W. 
MEYERS, MARY A. 
MITCHELL, MAUD D. 
MORGAN, BLANCHE A. 
MORRIS, TULA F. 
MORTON, MARY 
NELSON, ANNE 
NEWCOMBE, HARRIET D. 
NEWHALL, BERNICE E. 
NOBLi., ALDA A. 
NORTON, EDITH F. 
NOYES, IRENE H. 
ODEH, NASRA 
OSBORNE, LUCY A. 
PARKER, GRACE A. 



PEACOCK, JULIET A. 
PHILLIPS, SUSAN 
PRATT, MABEL H., A.B. 
PRYOR, LOUISA I. 
PUTNAM, KATHARINE L. 
RAMSAY, MARGARET 
RAND, ALICE S. 
RIDER, FRANCES M. 
ROBINSON, MARTHA H. 
ROGERb, ANNIE B. 
SANBORN, GENELLA S. 
SANDALL, MARY F. 
SHERMAN, LOUISE R. 
SHOLES, BERTHA M. 
SIMPSON, J. ELIZABETH 
SMITH, KATHERINE C. 
SMITH, LUELLA M. 
SOUTHWICK, CLARA 
SPOFFORD, LUCINDA F. 



STICKLE, MAUDE VAN B. 
STROHHAKER, GERTRUDE D. 
SUTTER, MINNIE 
THOMAS, ROWENA A. 
THURBER, DOROTHY 
WAKEFIELD, LURA M. 
WALES, SUSAN H. 
WALKER, EDITH G. 
WALLACE, JULIA F. 
WHEELER, ELIZABETH 
WHEELER, HARRIET M. 
WHITTIER, MABEL C. 
WHITTLE, ANNA K. C. 
WILDE, GRACE M. 
W1NSOR, ANNA G. 
WISE, LOUISE 
WOOD, MARY L. 












95 



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HE Student Guild, founded in 1903, is the one organization 
in College representing the entire student body. The 
aim of the Guild is to unite the students more closely, 
bring them together for sociability, lead in creating and 
organizing new interests, and above all encourage and cherish a strong, 
loyal college spirit. 

The Council, composed of the executive officers of the Guild and 
the chairmen of the different committees, plans the work of the Guild. 
To the Welcoming, Visiting and Student Aid Committee is delegated 
the difficult and yet thoroughly satisfying task of helping to unify the 
interests of the girls. To the Program committee falls the arrangement 
for all social events given by the Guild, also the posting of notices for 
college and class parties. The Bulletin Committee supervises the ar- 
rangement of the bulletin board and in the autumn conducts the sale 
of second-hand books. 

Our Student Guild belongs to the Woman's Intercollegiate Asso- 
ciation for Student Government, sending its delegates, the President 
of the Guild and a Junior member, to the annual convention of the 
association. 

In November, 1910, Randolph Macon Woman's College entertained 
the delegates. To a northern girl the glimpse of southern social life 
was particularly interesting. 

There were four animated business meetings, at all of which there 
was an enthusiastic discussion of the many and varied phases of 
Student Government as it exists in the different colleges. And in this 
frank and earnest discussion all felt the tremendous value of such 
meetings. The broadened outlook gained by a comparison of the aims 
and accomplishments of the different colleges, is vital to the success 
of each student government organization and to the work as a whole. 

99 



It is hoped that the advantage to all in inspiration and incentive to 
further and better work will be great even as it has been to the 
delegates. 

In addition to the social events planned for our entertainment, the 
interclass basketball games came off at this time. It was thrilling to 
witness and be stirred by the college and class spirit and enthusiasm 
evidenced by the girls as they cheered the games and sang their very 
distinctly individual songs. 

Cornelia Reese 




ioo 




THE GUILD CHAIRMEN 



Elinor Whitney 



Margaret Withi 



Harriet Barrows 



Elinor Burnham 



Charlotte Noyes 



Margaret Plant 



Alice Sheehan 




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Florence Trimmer 



THE STUDENT GOVERNMENT CHAIRMEN 
Mildred Ackekman Elsie Converse 



Hilda Hough 



C|)t gituticnt #ctoernnmtt ^ssoctatton 



The Student (iovernment Association of Simmons College consists 
entirely of dormitory students. The officers are a President chosen 
at the spring meeting from the incoming Senior class, a Vice-President 
who is President of the Student Guild, a Secretary from the incoming 
Juniors, and a Treasurer from the incoming Sophomores. Each of the 
larger dormitories is in charge of a House Chairman assisted by Floor 
Proctors. Every small house has one Proctor. Only the above officers 
comprise the Council, the purpose of which is the maintenance of 
self-government for the Association. The Council also has charge of 
vesper services and of social entertainments at the dormitories. 

The quiet hour system adopted last spring has been successfully 
continued. Innovations this year are the organization of a fire drill 
and the maintenance of a store in the basement of North Hall for 
the convenience of the students. 

Margaret Stanley Davis 
103 




Li 



IcTflsptrs 



The half hour vesper services which have been held in North 
Hall on alternate Sunday evenings at 6:15 o'clock, have been of the 
simplest kind. Clergymen, representatives from the College and other 
speakers have responded most willingly and generously to invitations 
to speak on subjects of their own choosing. Some especial feature 
of solo music, either vocal or instrumental, has added attraction to 
almost every service. The increasing number of girls who attend 
the vespers proves that their interest is sincerely genuine. Some 
may be glad to know what the various evenings' programmes are: — 

1910 
Nov. 27. Dean Arnold — " The Value of Vesper Services." 

Piano Solo — Miss Katherine Parker. 
Dec. 11. Dr. Frank E. Farley — Selections from old Christmas poems. 

Tenor Solo — Mr. Charles Bell. 

1911 

Jan. 8. Rabbi Charles Fleischer — " Woman's Place in Society." 

Violin Solo — Mr. Everett Scott. 
Jan. 22. President Lefavour — "Religious Attitudes." 

Soprano Solo — Miss Ella M. Nash. 
Feb. T). Rev. Reginald H. Howe — " The Significance of Vespers." 
Feb. 19. Mr. Roger B. Hull — "The Habit of Must Missing It.'" 

Piano Solo — Miss Minnie Hellickson. 

Mar. 5. Miss Heloise Hersey — " The Modern Novel." 

Soprano Solo — Mrs. Henry Howard. 
Mar. 19. Dr. Percy Stiles — " Lincoln." 

Boy Soprano — Master Russell Bradford. 
Apr. 30. Dr. Frederic A. Ogg. 

Soprano Solo — Mrs. Frederic A. Ogg. 

Violin Solo — Miss Eleanor Perkins. 
May 14. Rev. Frank W. Padelford. 

Bass Solo — Mr. Burnard Dirgin. 

105 




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etutonal 3Soarti 



Editor-in-Chief, Marguerite F. Hawlet 
Business Manager, Margaret M. Plant 



a&soctatc ^Dftovjs 



Dorothy Hopkins '11 
Elsie E. Morse '11 
Gertrude L. Mumford '11 
Eleanor Lyman, '11 



Delphine Dusossoit '11 
Alice Sheehan '12 
Elizabeth H. Day '13 
Frances E. Upton '14 



in; 



<&kt Club 



The College Glee Club, which now numbers fifty-six, has had a 
very successful year. Much interest in the work has been shown by 
the well-attended weekly rehearsals, and the quality of work which 
has been attained is to be commended. The success of the club is 
largely due to Mr. Lynes, under whose competent direction it has 
practised for the past year. The officers of the club are: 

Leader — Mr. Frank Lynes 

Manager — Elsie E. Morse 

Secretary and Treasurer — Gertrude M. Sullivan. 

Chairman of the Music Committee — Alice A. Sheehan 

On March eighteenth the Glee and Mandolin Clubs, combined, 
gave a concert, followed by an informal dance, in Library B. The 
following excellent program was rendered: 



Blow, Blow 
Pride of May 


Glee Club 


Sargent 
Newton 


Three^ Merry Fiddlers 


Mandolin Club 


Fowler 


The Mission of the Bose 
The Kerry Dance 

Glee Club 


Co wen 
Molloy 


Kleine Sympbonie 


Mandolin Club 


Eschman 


Autumn Wind 
Loch Lomond 


Glee Club 


Roeekel 
Arr. by Lynes 


The Bedoin 


Mandolin Club 

i 08 


Kendall 



Hark the Robin's Early Song 

Glee Club 

Grinds 
Alma Mater 



President Lefavolr 
Dean Arnold 



Elsie Morse 



PATRONS 

MlSS DlALL 

Mrs. Freeman 

DANCE COMMITTEE 

Alice Sheehan, Chairman 

Hilda Hopkins 

Cornelia Penfield 



Lynes 



Dean Arnold 



Mr. Goodell 
Dr. Underwood 



Elizabeth Walker 



The club wishes to express its appreciation to Mr. Lynes for his 
work with them, and to extend its thanks to Miss Elizabeth Ellis for 
her able accompaniment. 



jWanfcoItn Club 



At a meeting of the Simmons College Mandolin Club held on 
Wednesday, January 4, May Ayers, 11, was elected leader for the year. 
Twenty members have joined the club, several of whom have had 
experience in similar organizations, and the outlook for this year's 
work is very bright. As was the case in 1908-09, the membership of 
the club has been limited to mandolin and violin players; violin 
music will be largely used, and an effort will be made to raise the 
efficiency of the players to a high musical standard. 

109 






NP 




THE SIMMONS ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION OFFICERS 



Imogene Shaw Nellie Slack Glenna True Elizabeth Walker Marie Gurdie 

Helen Anderson Caroline Aldrich Clara Flanders 



tmmons College Stljlettc assoriatton 



(^fftrrrei 



President 
Vice-President 
Secretary 
Treasurer 

Nellie M. Slack, 1911 
Glenna M. True, 1912 



*£rccutifcc 25oar& 



Caroline E. Aldrich 

Elizabeth M. Walker 

Clara M. Flanders 

Helen M. Anderson 

Marie W. Gurley, 1913 
Imogene G. Shaw, 1914 



Marie K. Carey, Special 

^upcrtoisor 

Florence S. Diall 

On April 18, 1910, Marjorie C. Elmes called a meeting of all those 
interested in forming an athletic association. A vote hy ballot pre- 
viously taken showed that faculty and students alike were almost 
unanimously in favor of such an association. A committee to draw 
up a constitution was chosen consisting of Glenna M. True, chairman, 
Gertrude F. Barbour 1910, Dorothy Hcpkins 1911, Elinor Whitney 1912, 
Olive Diall 1913. This committee reported February 20, 1911, and the 
constitution was accepted. Miss Diall, Dr. Mark and Dr. Andrews 
spoke most enthusiastically for the association and promised their 
support. Elsie L. Basset, Daisy I. McCormick, and Marie W. Gurdy 
were appointed a committee for the nomination of officers. During 
the following week all those who wished to join the S. A. A. were 
given an opportunity to vote and nearly half the College promptly 
responded. 

The S. A. A. rests at present upon a comparatively simple basis. 

"3 



It provides for basketball, tennis, and track events. Any member of 
the association is eligible to try for any or all of these sports provided 
she keeps up to the standard in her studies. There seems to be no 
reason why any Simmons girl cannot regulate her hours of work and 
recreation so that she may enter into some form of athletics. There 
is no question as to the physical and mental benefit which would result. 
The association awards a large S to each girl making and holding 
a record on the track, a smaller S to the winner of a tennis tournament, 
either doubles or singles, and to each girl who makes the varsity 
basketball team. Whole numerals are given to each girl who makes 
her class basketball team, and half-numerals to those who make their 
class track team. 

The object of the association is not only to take charge of 
athletics, but, as the constitution states, " to put into nearer commu- 
nication the various members of the student body." Undeniably 
college spirit is growing, but there is still such a lack of real feeling! 
Through the medium of the athletic association the girls may give 
their suggestions and services and thus make definitely their own some 
part of the growing life of Simmons. " It is each girl at her best which 
lends color and reality to her four yeai-s here." If she looks to herself 
for enthusiasm and loyalty, rather than to her neighbor, she is helping 
to make the college traditions, and if she gives her best she is helping 
to make those growing traditions perfect. 

Caroline Esther Aldrich 



114 



EasftrfJball 



The introduction of basketball in the year of 1909-10 has marked a 
distinctive development in the College athletics. It was a successful 
year in that it brought out the best material in College and made 
possible the choosing of a Varsity team, made up as follows: 

I. E. Pellman, 1913, forward M. Anderson, 1913, side center 

0. E. Dyer, 1913, forward E. Whitney, 1912, guard 
N. M. Slack, 1911, center C. F. Barbour, 1910, guard 

The organization of class teams gave chances for the display 
of class spirit and enthusiasm, and in every instance the earnestness 
and regularity with which the players came to basketball practice 
showed loyalty to the individual classes and appreciation for the new 
department and its efficient instructor, Miss Diall. 

At the Indoor Meet, April 23, 1910, the work of the year was 
strikingly shown in the final game between the two best teams. The 
playing was the best displayed during the year and ended with the 
score of 13 to 10 in favor of 1913. The lineup was as follows: 

1912 1913 

L. B. Nissen forward J. E. Pellman 

1. E. Adams forward 0. E. Dyer 

G. M. True center D. W. Hughitt 

C. E. Aldrich side center C. G. Babcock 

H. G. Carroll 
E. Whitney guard E. W. Walker 

D. I. McCormick guard M. Anderson 

Scorer, S. B. Ely; referee, Miss Diall. Time, 10 minute halves. 

The class of 1913 was finally awarded the Basketball Cup given 
by Miss Diall to be awarded each year to the basketball team victorious 
in the largest number of match games. 

"5 




Elsa Richardson 



Glenn a True 



Caroline Aldrich 
Manager 



Louise Nissen 
Captain 

Elinor Whitney 



Daisy McCormick 



1910-1911 

The second } r ear of basketball has been welcomed with enthusiastic 
spirit and a readiness for serious team work. The Seniors have been 
carrying too heavy schedules to allow time for team organization and 
practice, but they have felt keen interest in the practice work and 
games of the other classes. 

The Junior team, consisting of the following players, was awarded 
numerals March 14: Louise B. Nissen, captain; Caroline E. Aldrich, 
manager; Elinor Whitney, Glenna M. True, Ida E. Adams, Daisy I. 
McCormick. Substitutes: Katharine Parker, Elsa Richardson. 

The Sophomore team was awarded numerals March 16. The 
players are as follows: Jeanette E. Pellman, captain; Elizabeth M. 
Walker, manager; Dorothy W. Hughitt, Clarissa C. Babcock; Marion 
S. Donaldson; Dorothy Tyacke. 

The Freshman team was presented with numerals by the Juniors 
on March 14. The team is made up of the following players : Constance 
Ekstrand, captain; Helen M. Anderson, manager; Lillian Nisbet, Clara 
Flanders, Elizabeth Bealer. 

The championship match games will probably be played on the 
outdoor court. 



Cracfe Clients 



Two annual events, an Indoor Meet in February and a Field Day 
in May, are to be devoted to track athletics. The Indoor Meet, which 
is conducted under the management of the Executive Board of the 
S. A. A., will be omitted this year that the best effort may be put 
into the Field Day, to be held May 20th, 1911, at the College athletic 
field. The following track team managers are in charge of the events: 
Cornelia Reese, 1911; Glenna True, 1912; Clarissa G. Babcock, 1913; 
Elizabeth R. Bealer, 1914. 

117 




Marie Gurdy 
Marion Donaldson 



Dorothy Tyacke 



Inez Terrell 

Elizabeth Walker 
Manager 
Jeanette Pellman Clarissa Baecock 

Captain 



Irene Weed 

Dorothy Hughitt 




3faboor Mttt XOXO 



Individual ability in athletics during the pioneer year 1909-1910, 
was judged and rewarded at the Indoor Meet in the gymnasium April 
23, 1910. The four events — the horse, running high jump, standing 
high jump, and standing broad jump, were witnessed by a small but 
very enthusiastic audience. The results were as follows: 

Largest number of points, Freshmen; second largest number of 
points, Sophomores; third largest number of points, Juniors. 

RUNNING HIGH JUMP 

J. L. Blanchard, 1911, 1st 

E. M. Walker, 1913, M. Anderson, 1913, tie, 2nd 

G. M. True, 1912, 3rd 

RUNNING HIGH JUMP 

K. B. English, 1912, 1st J. L. Blanchard, 1911, 2nd 

M. Anderson, 1913, 3rd 

119 




Hazel Hale 



Lillian Nisbet 



Rosamond Ashley 
Constance Ekstrand 
Captain 



Helen Anderson 
Manager 



Ava Bassett 

Elizabeth Bealer 

Clara Flanders 



STANDING BROAD JUMP 

G. M. True, 1912, 1st E. M. Walker, 1913, 2nd 

M. Anderson, 1913, 3rd 

THE HORSE 

M. Clark, 1913, 1st N. M. Slack, 1911, 2nd 

Jessie L. Blanchard was awarded the individual cup presented 
by Miss Diall, to be held each year by the winner of the running high 
jump. 

TENNIS 

Class feeling surges high each year at the annual tennis tourna- 
ment. On June 4, 1910, with much display of class colors and many 
enthusiastic songs, the four classes gathered to cheer their individual 
champions, who were as follows : 

Marjorie C. Elmes, 1910 Mary E. Dunbar, 1911 

Elinor Whitney, 1912 Helen Sibley, 1913 

The preliminary matches were between Miss Elmes and Miss Whit- 
ney with the score 6 — 0, 6 — 1 in favor of Miss Whitney, and between Miss 
Dunbar and Miss Sibley, score 4 — 6, 8 — 6, 6 — 4, a hotly contested match 
in which the first set fell to Miss Dunbar and the last two to Miss Sibley. 

In the final match excitement ran high, and the rival classes vied 
with each other in encouraging their representatives. The first set was 
Miss Whitney's 6 — 3, the second went to Miss Sibley 6 — 1, and the last to 
Miss Whitney 6 — 4. 

Miss Whitney was presented with the individual silver cup, the 
gift of Dr. Evans, while the large tennis cup became the property of 
the class of 1912. 

1910-1911 
The tennis committee of 1909-10 has been re-elected to take charge 
of the season of 1910-11. The committee consists of Dorothy Hopkins, 
1911; Elinor Whitney, 1912; Olive Diall, 1913. 



121 




J-TL 



L_ 



>^ =-& 



In the doubles tournament held November 12, 1910, the following 
girls represented their respective classes : 

Mary E. Dunbar, 1911 Marion Donaldson, 1913 

Grace Welsh, 1911 Winifred Douglas, 1913 

Elinor Whitney, 1912 Helen Anderson, 1914 

Hazel Turner, 1912 Norma Libby, 1914 

In the preliminary match, 1914 lost to 1912 by default, and after 
three close sets 1911 was victorious over 1913. In the final match, 1912 




122 




s 

o 
c 

I 

.L 

E 

v 

E 

N 
T 

S 



>octaI Calendar, 19104911 



1910 
Oct. 1 Student Government Dance to Freshmen. 
Oct. 8 Annual Guild Reception. 
Oct. 29 Hallowe'en Party. 
Dec. 16 Senior Party. 
Dec. 17 Christmas Party. 

1911 

Jan. 7 Senior-Freshman Party. 

Feb. 22 Washington's Birthday. 

Mar. 11 Junior Freshman Party. 

Mar. 18 Glee Club Concert. 

Apr. 8 Sophomore-Freshman Party. 

Apr. 22 Tea for Seniors by Mrs. Kehew. 

Apr. 22 Sophomore-Freshman Picnic. 

Apr. 28 Junior Prom. 

May 1 Senior-Faculty Party. 

May 13 Sophomore Luncheon. 

May 20 Junior-Sophomore Picnic. 

May 27 Guild Reception. Athletic Meet. 

June 14 Commencement Day. 

124 



junior $rotn. 



On the 28th of April, 1911, a red letter day for her, the Junior 
class made her debut. In the weeks before this tremendous event in 
history, she had lived in a haze of composite expectation and sup- 
pressed enthusiasm. Of course it would not have done to be visibly 
excited, still such an occasion would come but once in her four-year 
lifetime. The momentous questions that arose were appalling. 

First a man! She was from the West and knew no available man 
on this side of the Mississippi; or she had a very eligible escort at Yale 
but of course that was too far to come; or she knew so many that she 
could not decide in anyone's favor. But in such a crisis no one can 
possibly " corner the market " and escorts can be obtained by lot 
or loan. 

Next, a gown, and she felt a decided inclination toward a sweeping 
train for this, her first real ball. 

Finally, the night so long awaited, so slow to come, arrived. The 
Junior Class was in a flurry of excitement and filled with dread for- 
boding lest an unwary suitor be carried beyond his destination, lest 
the flowers which he had sent should blend or disagree in a heart- 
rending fashion — a small thing, one might say, but still a tragedy 
at such a time. The Junior flower was the daisy and her colors gold 
and white. With these the bare dining-hall had been transformed into 
a charming setting for the Prom., and each Junior felt justly pleased. 
She deemed the effect complete and almost egotistically she advanced 
to the line which was to greet her and sanction her presence in society. 
Surely her taste had been excellent, her reception left nothing to be 
desired. 

Perhaps on similar occasions the music had been just as tuneful 
and the dances as enjoyable, but to the Junior and the various ones who 

126 



hovered on the outskirts, eager but biding their time, everything 
seemed the acme of perfection. And the supper — even the presence 
of chicken salad, a very good " friend of the college," was visibly ap- 
preciated, although at the close of her Sophomore year the Junior had 
vowed to sever her speaking relations with him. 

But as slow as the night had been in coming, it seemed to triple its 
speed during the short five hours of its visit. The hands of the pitiless 
clock also seemed to dance in their turn and skip and revel around 
the course. All too reluctantly did the Junior acknowledge that mid- 
night had arrived and with it the end of her "night of nights." 




127 



J^tuDent (^obernment Bance 



Of course the Freshmen haven't forgotten the two parties which 
we upper classmen gave in their honor at the beginning of the year. 
We are sure that the Student Government Dance, which was given in 
the Refectory on the evening of October frst, at least temporarily 
lightened the hearts of the homesick dormitory girls and we hope 
that it was the means of forming many new and lasting friendships. 
At the Guild Reception on the following Saturday we gladly welcomed 
all the new girls. The afternoon was spent in dancing and getting 
acquainted. 




129 



Mentor jjresljman |3artp 



The annual party given by the Senior class to the Freshman 
occurred on the afternoon of Saturday, January 7, at the Refectory. 
For some weeks a general curiosity had been excited, for the invita- 
tions, which were in the form of a terrifying letter from the 
class of 1911, had warned the Freshmen that the affair was planned 
in order to give them some understanding of the horrors of the coming 
years. They were called upon to witness the " Senior's Sobress through 
the Halls of Learning." 

The " Sobress " proved to be a vivid portrayal of the experiences 
of four pilgrims journeying through the lands Secretaria, Libreria, 
Sciencia, and Housecia. As they met and vanquished the hori'ible 
dragon of Mid-years and struggled through the Slough of Despond, 
as they fought with the wicked knights of Shorthand, Reference, 
Chemistry, and Cooking, labored with the Faculty, and finally emerged 
triumphant, the audience grew more and more enthusiastic. During 
the afternoon a chorus of girls sang the old grinds of Glee Club 
concerts, which were new to the audience, and fitted most appropriately 
with the action on the stage. The success of the entertainment was 
in a large measure due to the cordial co-operation of the entire 
Senior Class. 




130 



©ormitorp parties 



f altotoe'en 

What happy recollections we have of the Children's Party which 
was held in celebration of Hallowe'en ! All ages of children were 
represented, from babyhood up, and it was a very jolly gathering of 
"little folks" that assembled around the harvest-laden tables in the 
Refectory that evening. The long rows of tables, lighted by candles 
in fruit holders, were most picturesque. Peals of laughter and the 
merry voices of " children " filled the room. After dinner a series 
of Mother Goose tableaux was presented in South Hall for the amuse- 
ment of the " little ones." At the conclusion of these, we all returned 
to the Refectory and danced, stopping every now and then long enough 
to quench our thirst with a drink of sweet cider, fresh from the barrel, 
and to nibble a doughnut or apple. It was certainly a very jolly party 
and much credit is due to the following committee for its success: 
Hilda Hough, Chairman; Daisy Ludden, Hope Carroll, Mabel Magee, 
Ruth Barker. 



(E^rf0tma0 

The annual Christmas celebration was held on the Saturday 
before vacation. During our Christmas dinner we were tantalized 
by the sight of mysterious " joke " gifts which lay under the gaily 
decorated trees placed on the tables. Not until all had finished were 
we allowed to open our presents. Then there was much laughter 
over the clever hits. In the evening tableaux were given - " The 
Reveries of a Bachelor" and "The Seven Ages of Women." 

131 



^astmtgton Etrtitoaj) ^attp 





Thus ran the invitations on the posters which proclaimed the 
coming of our annual celebration of Washington's natal day. On 
the night of the 22nd there entered the banquet hall, which was 

adorned with flags, a throng 
of maidens (and " men ") 
garbed in colonial style. 
Last of all entered the state- 
ly George himself, accom- 
panied by his charming 
wife. Then might have been 
heard coming from the lips 
of stately colonial dames 
such strange remarks as, 
" Doesn't Glenna make a corking man ! " and " Isn't Marjorie 
fetching!" After a repast in which cherries and Washington pie bore 
a prominent part, it was announced that General and Mrs. Washington 
would hold a reception in South Hall. Thither the guests thronged 
and were presented, admired each others' costumes, or listened to the 
music of the piano — perhaps " spinet " woidd be more in keeping. 
It was often hard to recognize friends in their unusual garb. One 
unknown belle caused considerable excitement and whispered ques- 
tions, but when she smiled they at last recognized "Bess." 

Soon the party was summoned to the Refectory which had been 
transformed into a theatre, ready for the presentation of a short 

132 




play, " The Interrupted Proposal." Shouts of laughter rose as the 
screens were drawn aside and the elderly father and mother were 
recognized. The" action moved rapidly and, after two thrilling pro- 
posals, the play ended with a touching tableau. The actors were 
forced to respond to repeated curtain calls. The cast of the play 
was as follows : 
Margaret Niles Mrs. Stone 
Susan Lyle Helen Stone 
Ernestine Giddings 

Miss Ramsey 
Alice Sheehan Betty 

Ida Adams Mr. Stone 

Ruth Hayford Mr. Tracy 
Margaret Davis 

Steve Howard 

The rest of the evening 

was spent in dancing and 

the party closed with a Virginia reel. The committee in charge of 
the entertainment was: Florence Trimmer, chairman; Winifred 
Douglas, Anna L. Burchard, Alice M. Hartshorn, Enid B. Johnson. 





133 




I N ST Ru ctms v c\ug 

Spell arid pu.T)ctuate the 
p o U o uj W-i cj ; _ __ 

a S\. W O^JUCxMiL to feacA tKa 
Koltuv^jlcI yiiLddJua Jai.TWno cr-n. a. 




ruTr^ p ed 



o'C> 



The Instructors' Club, when they met on January 17, little knew 
what was in store for them. The meeting began with a dinner — 
served in the college lunchroom, which was decorated with evergreen 
for the occasion. The Club expected to listen to an after-dinner talk 
by a gentleman who had known Mr. Simmons. He was to talk 
about the intentions of Mr. Simmons in founding the College, and 
how far they had been carried out. He was also to tell the instructors 
some stories about the earlier days of the College. Thej r were, there- 
fore, greatly disappointed to find that, owing to a severe cold, the 
speaker was obliged to postpone his talk. The dinner was good, how- 
ever; the golden daffodils and other table decorations had a soothing 
effect; and the instructors gradually forgot their trials and were lulled 



134 




" ci ^ , ''^^^^m^m^w^ w W} 






j 



i 1 







into a feeling of pleasure and content, which alas! after dinner was 
soon to be destroyed. Miss Robbins, the President of the Club, 
graciously requested everyone to take a seat in the students' study 
room. Then she arose, with a long pointer in her hand, and announced 
that she had arranged a little entertainment to take the place of the 
address they expected to have. They would have, she said, a little 
spelling match. Then consternation seized the entire gathering. Some 
basely tried to escape; one put his glasses in his pocket and shame- 
lessly declared he had lost them; another said her fountain pen was 
dry; another was threatened with a sudden attack of nosebleed. In 
short, they practised all the excuses they had learned from students 
in their different classes, but in vain. Dr. Eldridge and Miss Jackson 
inexorably handed a pencil to each one present, and Dr. Eldridge, 
after requesting each to write the honor statement and to sign his 
or her real name, dictated the following sentence : " It is agreeable 
to face the unparalleled embarrassment of a harassed pedlar or 
saddler sitting on the wall of a cemetery considering the symmetry 
of a peeled potato." 

After much sighing, the sentence was finally written by all, and 
the examining committee took the papers to correct. We regret to 
be obliged to confess that some of the names signed were fictitious; 
and the honor statement was, in one case, changed to this: "The pres- 
ence of Mr. So-and-so beside me was absolutely of no help to me." 

The examining committee themselves were not very sure about 
the spelling of several words, and the rest of the Club hesitated not 
at all in declaring that they put no confidence in them, even bringing 
in dictionaries from the various class rooms to prove themselves right. 
It was almost a case of the blind leading the blind. Finally, it was 
discovered that only one paper had no errors, and that, in one instance, 
the mistakes ran as high as seven. The Faculty have since decided 
to introduce a course in spelling — for Freshmen. 

135 




THE SENIOR CLASS EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 



Mildred Ackerman 
Florence Trimmer 
Secretary 



Lucy Towle 
Margaret Withey 
President 



Marjorie Sutcliffe 
Charlotte Noyes 
Vice-President 



Helen Woodward 
Lillian Williams 
Treasurer 




THE SENIOR CLASS CHAIRMEN 
Madelaine Scott 



Lucy Towle 



Ernestine Giddings 
Hilda Hopkins 




w 

w 

H 



O 

u 



o 

O 
£ 

w 

X 
H 



•J K 



£ a 



W z 



s 



%\)t jfootpat!) to $'0 




(Apologies to Van Dyke) 
take pleasure in life by making use of your easy instruc- 
tors; to be satisfied at doing a little but not contented until 
you make it seem twice as much; to despise nothing ex- 
cept point blank questions, and to fear nothing except 
getting caught; to be governed always by an apparent vast admiration 
for your instructors' jokes, rather than disgust at his long lessons; to 
think seldom of the amount you do not know but dress up the little 
you do for all occasions; to spend some time with real grinds, now and 
then, to give a good impression; and above all, create a wonderful 
reputation for cheerful interest and unflagging industry. These are 
some of the little guide posts on the foot-path to P's. 

L'ENVOI 

When Earth's last history is written, 

And our note-books are laid aside; 
When the syllabus fails in its mission, 

And the tongues of the " sharks " are tied, 
We shall rest; and, faith, we shall need it, 

Lie down for an aeon or two, 
Till the Master of all good lectures 

Shall set us to work anew! 

And those that got " P " shall be happy, 

They shall read three new histories through; 
They shall write in a six-foot note-book 

With pen-points dipped in dew; 
They shall take real notes from real heroes, 

Napoleon — Metternich — all, 
They shall write forty reams in an hour, 

And never get tired at all ! 

140 



And only the Master shall flunk us, 

And only the Master shall pass; 
And no one shall lie for favor, 

And no one shall lie for brass; 
But each for the joy of honor, 

And each in his separate star, 
Shall write, " I have read twenty minutes 

And hand in his slips as they are! 




141 



$ou> Wt fn\ about 3t 



Resolved: The class in English 2h should not be obliged to study 
argumentation, for 

I. It takes time from other studies, for 

A. It requires more time than is scheduled for the study of 
English 2 1), for 
1. An argument requires a longer time for preparation than 
the ordinary theme, for 
a. It requires more time for thought than the ordinary 
theme, for 
(1) It must be reasoned out before being written, for 
(a) It must be logical, for 

(l 1 ) A correct argument is always logical. 

II. It is harmful to the students, for 

A. It lowers their interest in class work, for 

1. It produces a general lassitude in class, for 
a. It deadens the alertness of the brain, for 

(1) It requires too much work of the brain, for 

(a) It requires a continued concentration of 
mind, for 
(l 1 ) All argumentation is the result of 
mental application. 

III. It shortens the life of the instructor, for 
A. It draws from his energy, for 

1. He must use his energy to pound logical arrangements of 
arguments into the students, for 
a. They continually employ incorrect arrangements,/or 
(1) They cannot reach logical conclusions, for 
(a) The}' cannot think logically, for 
(l 1 ) They are women. 

142 



%\)t ika g»ong 



A fisherman's lad was he, 

With the song of the sea in his heart. 

From his boat on the tossing sea 

He watched the waves quiver and part, 

The white foam shiver and dart, 

And the song ever sang in his heart — 

A fisherman's lad was he. 

While the line pulled loose in his hand, 

And the salt breeze fingered his hair, 

He dreamed of another land 

Far away from the strong sea air; 

And he wished for treasures rare, 

And he pictured castles fair, 

While the line pulled loose in his hand. 

He entered a city's strife 

In search of the stuff of his dream. 

He entered the city's life, 

Where streets with a great crowd stream, 

And smoke-covered buildings teem 

With the lives that are run by steam. 

He entered a city's strife. 

And the song in his heart he sold, 
And the worth of his muscle and brawn. 
But he gathered in stores of gold 
While he labored from early dawn; 
And his face grew withered and drawn 
And the light from his eyes was gone, 
For the song in his heart he sold. 

143 



With chests lined with glistening gold, 

With a right to broad stretches of land, 

Still, he longed for the pleasures of old. 

The pull of the line in his hand, 

And the song of the waves wind-fanned, 

And the feel of the cool damp sand, 

He would buy with his glistening gold. 

A fisherman's son was he, 
With the sea song gone from his heart. 
He sought out the home by the sea. 
He watched the waves quiver and part, 
The white foam shiver and dart, 
But the song never sang in his heart. 
A man of the world was he. 




144 




©n tEntbing tfjr Boor 




often wonder why we children made such a fnss about 
doing " bell-service." " Bell-service " was nothing more 
or less than answering the door-bell, yet the very term 
seemed to carry offense with it. It was one of our 
numerous dislikes, and we stuck to it to a man, or rather to a woman, 
considering that boys were decidedly in the minority. It was char- 
acteristic of us as a family to hold the same objects in abhorrence: 
" The only point that does unite those scrappy children is their 
dislikes," a cross aunt had once said of us, and well she might talk, 
for she was one of those very dislikes, and duly inscribed on our 
" Hatred List," a document of which the Evil One would have been 
proud. But to return to the " bell-service." Our old servant, 
Aneschka, diminutive only in name, was wont to complain in whining 
tones to our mother that every blessed Wednesday when she got ready 

145 



to leave, not a child was to be found high or low, a strange fact when 
von consider that there were nine of us in those days. In our justifica- 
tion it may be said, that we had evolved an elaborate plan as to who 
should do duty each week, and accordingly a chart hung in the school- 
room, flanked by dates conspicuous in red ink. It might as well have 
hung in the deserts of Africa; for when Wednesday came, we 
disappeared. 

But Aneschka was a wily creature, and rose to the occasion every 
time. It amuses me now when I remember how easily her wiles 
trapped us. She had a way of banging the door, and of sounding a 
wonderfully realistic dying out of steps which always deceived some 
unlucky creature, and the first child that unsuspectingly strayed forth 
was grabbed by that " horror of an Aneschka " and left to guard the 
door. 

After a stage of vindictive planning against the more lucky 
deserters, came a stage of making the best of things. By the time the 
other cisht returned, looking serene and preoccupied, behold the " bell- 
servant " comfortably enthroned in the kitchen, eating apples and 
reading the book then most popular in the family, and sitting on as 
many more as she thought might be in demand. Such a proceeding 
was perfectly safe, for no one dared address the victim of Aneschka's 
wiles, going on the principle that it was best to " let sleeping dogs lie." 
There was great pleasure in watching them go down to the garden, 
one by one, with books that were usually scorned, such as the " Wide, 
Wide World" and "The Golden Ladder." 

But they had their revenge. The " bell-servant " was kept on the 
jump admitting them, as they toiled up the stairs from the garden on 
hollow pretenses such as " a drink of water," when there was a well 
in the garden, and " a handkerchief." Caution had to be used in letting 
them in but- one at a time, lest the stolen books be rescued, and it was 
good policy to pretend not to hear the mumbled remarks about a 
" dog in the manger." But when eight people must have handkerchiefs, 
and drinks of hike-warm water — the pump in the garden was seem- 
ingW ignored — " bell-service " becomes deleterious to the temper. I 
remember that once when the toilers of the stairs had persecuted me 
beyond all endurance, I resolved to chastise the next comer, and 

146 



broom in hand, I lay in wait. The bell rang, I flung open the door 
with a horrible shriek, and faced not one of the eight, but the Consul's 
wife! To her praise be it said that she acted like a perfect lady. 
You would have thought that in this, and in no other way, was she 
accustomed to be received. When she had gathered from my confused 
remarks that my mother was not at home, she smiled benignly at me, 
and rustled down the stairs. As for me, I could have shaken hands 
with the Queen of Sheba, for " there was no spirit left in me." Reduced 
to a crushed, penitent " bell-servant," I wept into Aneshka's red table- 
cloth. Just then the smallest " toiler " came thumping up the stairs 
in great dejection. We fell to comforting one another, and while he 
sat in my lap with his toy horse clasped tightly, I affectionately upset 
his digestion by feeding him apples to his heart's content. 

Yes, it was always so, " bell-service " ended in disaster, and no 
good was ever known to come of it; but, oh, what would I not give to 
be " bell-servant " again for just one afternoon, provided the other 
eight were still there! 




H7 



%\)t Special 



Breakfast late and wander down 
To inspect the latest gown. 
Stop at Huyler's on the way, 
And enjoy a fig-sundae. 
Meet a friend who wishes me 
To go with her to a tea. 
" Oh, I'm busy now, you know, 
And I have to study so! 
Never have a minute free, 
Have to work so awfully. 
I'm sure I'd rather dance all night, 
Than try to make a pudding right. 

Going this evening to the ball? 

Of course, I always go to all, 

Then skip my morning class you see. 

What's college to society? 





148 



%\)t f$ou0cj)oto 6c. (girl 



Why is it that I cannot make 
An apple pie or chocolate cake? 
I wish I were a born cook, 
For I can't learn it from a book. 
It's mix up this and beat that in, 
And roll it out till it is thin. 
My recipes I'm sure you'd like, 
And I perhaps could be Miss D-k-, 
But when it comes to doing all this, 
That's when my things go so amiss. 
I always seem to be awry, 
My hair, in spite of all, will fly. 
If they would only let me be, 
I think 'twould stay quite properly, 
But when they tell me nothing's right 
It stands on end with very fright. 



In sewing also 

troubles come, 

Each finger seems 
to be a thumb. 

My seams I'm apt 

to leave unbound 

Or put my sleeves in 
wrong side round. 

There is no life 

as hard indeed, 

\s that the Household 
Ec. girls lead. 




149 



How dear to the heart is the old Boston Public 
When fond recollection presents it to view, 
Bates Hall, the round end, the department statistic, 
And every loved spot which the Simmons girl knew; 
The cat'loguing room and the one that's near by it. 
The circular staircase and where the same leads, 
Congressional records, the rest that are nigh it 
And e'en the old set which nobody reads — 
The serial set, oh the sheep-bound set, 
The dust-covered set which nobody reads. 




150 



extracts from tijc 3^tit3atj>at of a jfttsfmtan 



Wake! For the Rising Bell with clanging Might 
Drives Dreams of Home away from us with Night; 

Sends Sleep along with them, and, echoing loud, 
Bids us turn on the Gas and strike a Light. 

II 
Before the Breakfast Summons, ringing, died, 
Methought a Voice in the Refectory cried, 

" When all the Bacon is prepared within, 
Why linger lazy Students yet outside?" 

Ill 

And, when the Mail came, those who stood before 
The Office shouted — •" Open then the Door! 

You know how little while we have to read 
Our Letters, ere to Class we go once more." 

IV 

Now the dread Mid-years, met with Undesire. 
The wise young Studes to Solitude retire 

Where the White Bandaged Heads abound, and Lights 
Are burned till Midnight tolls from churchly spire. 

V 

Exams indeed have set the 

Chairs in Rows, 
And eke the Questions 

whereof no one knows 

The answers, though the 
Bluffers do their worst, 
And many a Bright One 

of her Knowledge blows. 




151 



VII 
Come, boil sonic Fudge, and in the Chafing-Dish, 
Your largest Chocolate-soaked Stirrer swish: 

The Ones who grind may Hunk out after all — 
To bone can never guarantee a Wish. 

VIII 
Whether in Dormitory or Brookline, 
Whether you early rise, or sleep till Nine, 

The Themes in English 1 keep falling due, 
The Conferences are posted, Sign by Sign. 

XII 

An afternoon at some good Matinee, 
A College Ice, some Violets, and say 

Some Page and Shaws to nibble afterward, — 
Oh, even Man were passable that Way. 

XIII 
Some for the Guild Assessments plead, and some 
Remind us of our Class Dues yet to come, — 

Oh, keep your Cash, unless your Credit's poor, 
In which Case, look the other Way, — keep mum! 

XXV 

Alike for those who for To-day prepare, 
And those that cutting on the Morrow dare, 

A Warning on the Board of Bulletins proves — 
That Absences have Penalties somewhere. 




XXVII 

Myself last Fall, 

did recklessly frequent 
The Play on Chapel Afternoons; 

and Argument 

About it heard I till, 

the last Term's End, — 
Came I from off the List 

Whereon I went. 



XLIII 

So, when the future task you contemplate 
At last shall find you when you graduate, 

Remembering past Cuts and their Result, — 
In sad Repentance, — you shall ne'er be late. 

XCIX 
Ah, Chum! could you and I with Time conspire, 
To grasp the knowledge of the Years entire, 

Would we not praise our Founder's Wisdom more, 
And ever laud our Alma Mater higher? 

TAMAM 




A^INTET^E^TING- MOMENT, 



153 



{£ftc is>tmmott0 Sllpfjatot 



A's for Miss -rn-ld 
Who smiles as she hears 
Our excuses for cutting 
In use here for years. 

It's also for -ndr-ws 

At whose urgent suggestion 

We try to show interest 

In the old " Eastern Question." 

Then there's Miss -11-s-n 
Who helps us a lot 
When up those four flights 
For reserved books we trot. 

B 

B is for B-lt-n 
Who loves ancient maps 
And names like Akhnaton, 
And worse ones, perhaps. 

C 
C stands for C-m-pb-11 
Who is very precise; 
His looks and his actions 
Show that he's nice. 

D 

D's Dr. D-w-ng, 
In Philosophy deep, 
His hard thesis questions 
Have robbed us of sleep. 



It's also for D-k-, 

Instructor in cooking, 

She's always nearby 

When you think she's not looking. 

E 
E is for -ldr-dg- 
Who, when we condense 
His course in two years, 
Makes the study intense. 



F is for F-r-l-y 
Whom the girls all waylay 
When they have a late theme 
Which must bear his " 0. K." 

G 
G is G- - d-11, 
Pride of the college, 
That he is our favorite 
We hereby acknowledge. 

H 
H is for H-nf-rd 
Who, lest he be late, 
Sprints to college 
At a two-forty rate. 



I is Instructors 

Who meet, we know well, 

To discuss all the girls 

Who have more than one " L.' 



155 



J is the Juniors 

Who round College do storm 

When their friends fail to save 

them 
A dance for the Prom. 

K 
K is for K-ngsb-ry, 
When invited to dine 
Arrives at dessert, — 
" A mistake in the time." 

L 

L is L-f-v- - r 
Who at chapel presides, 
And food for our hungering 
Souls there provides. 

M 
M is for M-tzl-ff 

Who with much charm and ease 
Tells stories, or pours 
At the faculty teas. 

M's also for M-rg-n, 
The dormitory delight, 
Who always is ready 
To help us out of a plight. 

N 
N stands for N-rr-s; 
Chemistry's his forte, 
He's right at his ease 
When over a retort. 


is for — gg 
Who to us is a mystery 
When he lectures so clearly 
On puzzling History. 



P is Miss P-tt-n 
Who cashes the checks, 
Which to father seem large 
But to us are mere specks. 

Q 

Q is the Questions 
They ask us at finals, 
Which send the cold shivers 
Along our spinals. 




R is for R-bb-ns 
Who keeps us at work 
In Library Science 
Which no one can shirk. 

S 
S is for St-l-s 

Who drew with great ease 
Many cuts in this book 
Which surely will please. 

156 



T 
T is for Th-dd- -s 
Who saves us a climb 
With our Library books 
Which must be there on time. 

U 

U is for — nd-rw- -d, 
Master of knowledge, 
Of kindness, of humor, 
Liked by the whole College. 



W 

W is the work 

We all have to do 

Over every week end 

And which makes us feel blue. 

X 

X is the unknown, — 
Namely, our fate, 
Which the faculty seals 
With a skill consummate. 



V is Vacation 

For which we're all strong. 
But for unknown reasons 
Can never prolong. 



Y is the yoke 

We all have to bear. 

It sometimes seems heavy 

And not at all fair. 



Z is the Zeal 

Which the instructors display 
As they plan out our work 
For a 20 hr. day. 




MICROCOSM ADVERTISEMENTS 



C, The Microcosm Board wishes to 
express their sincere appreciation to 

Champlain & Farrar 

161 Tremont Street 

for their excellent workmanship and 
extremely thoughtful interest in 
making the photographs in this 
book such a success 



MICROCOSM ADVERTISEMENTS 




Crockery, China and 
Glassware 



The Athena Pattern. 
French China. 



The newest shapes and decorations of 
TABLE WARE and ORNAMENTAL 
PIECES constantly arriving from the hest 

Potteries and Glass Factories of Englandi France, Germany, Austria, China, Japan and 

America. Patrons will find extensive exhibits in 

Dinner Set Department Art Pottery Rooms 

Glassware Department Lamp Department 

Stock Pattern Department Hotel and Club Department 

In our KITCHENWARE DEPARTMENT is an extensive variety of Souffle 
Dishes, Egg Poachers, Cafetierers, Casseroles, Cocottes, Shirred Egg Dishes, etc., in 
French Porcelain and other wares. Also plain and decorated wares for kitchen and 
pantry. The Blue Willow pattern in full assortment. Ye' ">w Mixing Bowls and 
Nappies, Blanc Mange Moulds, Blue Edge Pie Plates, etc. 

Students' Requisites 

Lamps, Tea Sets, Chocolate Pots and Sets, Candlesticks, Welsh Rarebit Plates, 
Jardinieres, Ferneries, Bureau Sets, Bon Bon Dishes, Plates of all kinds, odd Pitchers 
in endless variety, as well as Bric-a-Prac suitable for complimentary and wedding gifts. 
Glassware of all grades. Inspection invited. 

Jones, McDuffee (EX Stratton Co. 

China and Glass Merchants 



33 Franklin, cor. Hawley .Streets 



Near Washington and .Summer Streets 



M. SL liru & (En. 

FINE STATIONERS, PRINTERS 5 ENGRAVERS 

ORDERS OF DANCE 



SPECIAL PRICES ON VISITING CARD 
PLATES AND CARDS 



5 and 7 West Street 
Boston 



The Fisk Teachers Agencies 

EVERETT 0. FISK & CO., Proprietors 
2 a. PARK STREET, BOSTON, MASS. 



56 Fifth Ave., New York, N.Y.; 1505 Penn. 
Ave., Washington, D. C. ; 39 Jackson Block, 
Chicago, 111.; S16 Central Savings Bank Bldg., 
Denver, Colo.; 611 Swetland Building, Portland, 
Ore.; 2142 Shattuck Ave.. Berkeley, Cal. ; 238 
Douglas Building, Los Angeles, Cal. 
Si- ml to any of the above addresses for Agency 
Manual and registration form . 



Telephone 3899-3 Back Bay 



AMES & GINTY 




Stoves 
Heaters 
Chimney Caps 



Automobile Tanks 
Drip Pans 

and Guards 



Fenway Station, Back Bay 

John Andrew Ginty Boston, MaSS. 



..Delicious Chocolates- 
Bonbons, Ice Cream Sodas, 
College Ices, Hot Chocolate 

i46Tremont St. 414 Boylston St. 139 Summer St . 



11 



MICROCOSM ADVERTISEMENTS 



SILKS, CREPES 
and PONGEES 



Goods Suitable for Graduation Gowns. 
We are never undersold and are glad 
to submit samples 



Walter M. Hatch & Co. 

43 and 45 Summer St. 



(ilimtpluwnia of 3ttd?p?nfcnt 3!r? C0. 



in 



MICROCOSM ADVERTISEMENTS 



WHAT IT MEANS TO YOU 



PROMPTNESS in filling orders 
STYLE in latest display 



ACCURACY in every detail 
ECONOMY in all our estimates 



Special Attention Given to College Printing 



WARREN J. CRAWLEY, P RINTER 

HOOSAC COURT Tel. 245-2 NORTH ADAMS, MASS. 



\wP 





^i> 




WHITE 
HOUSE 

COFFEE 
AND TEA 



WHITE HOUSE COFFEE is sold whole Roasted, Ground (granulated) or Pulverized. We recommend you to buy 
it whole roasted and to grind it at your own home. If you haven't a coffee mill— get one. White House Coffee 
does not depend on questionable methods to encourage its introduction or sale, but it does measure up to the highest 
standard of Coffee quality the world knows anything about, and we guarantee it to be all it is represented; the best 
that money and brains can place within your reach, and at not an extravagant price. Now sold by 21,000 Grocers. 



WHITE HOUSE TEA , sold in quarter and half pound tins (five distinct names or varieties), just as good as 
WHITE HOUSE COFFEE in one, two and three pound tins— no other way. 

DWINELL-WRIGHT CO., Importers and Roasters, Boston— Chicago 



IV 



MICROCOSM ADVERTISEMENTS 



Albert P. Smith Telephone "Richmond "1647 



Smith Brothers 

lutter, (EIjppbp and lEgga 

2 and 4 Faneuil Hall Market 
and Basement No. 3 



BOSTON 



MASS. 



Sole Receivers of 

RANDOLPH CREAMERY 

Rest at The Outlook 

.Arlington Heights 



Highest Altitude 7 Miles from Boston 



Open all the year. Tel. 713 L 



The Genuine 

<^-'l$lb Lombard Blouses 

^ i In Serge, Flannel 




i Wash Materials 

Also our 

New Outing Shirts 

Can only be obtained of 

HENRY S. LOMBARD 

22 to 26 Merchants Row - BOSTON, MASS. 




JowKefs 

CHOCOLATES 

We grind our own chocolate and know 
how choice the materials are that give 
LOWNEY'S CHOCOLATES that de- 
licious NATURAL flavor. All the 
Lowney Chocolate products and 
Lowney's Cook Book are of the same 
superfine quality. 

RETAIL STORE 

416 Washington Street 

NEAR SUMMER 

You don't know what fountain drinks 
are until you know ours. 



MICROCOSM ADVERTISEMENTS 



Book, Job and Mercantile Printing of all Kinds 



i 



4 



4 



WILLIAM B. LIBBY 



4 ~ 1 

Monotype Book Composition 9 

o o 

227 Tremont Street, Boston, Mass. | 



| 

A ° 

$• Telephone Oxford 2668-1 ^ 

l 



VI 




THE MERRYMOUNT PRESS 

PRINTS FOR 

HARVARD UNIVERSITY 

HARVARD MEDICAL SCHOOL 

SIMMONS COLLEGE 

WELLESLEY COLLEGE 

YALE UNIVERSITY PRESS 

COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 

BROWN UNIVERSITY 

WILLIAMS COLLEGE 

TRINITY COLLEGE 

SAINT MARK'S SCHOOL 

GROTON SCHOOL 

CARNEGIE FOUNDATION 

FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF 

TEACHING 

AND MANY OTHER 

INSTITUTIONS OF LEARNING 



m » mi Mr tam | 

WebsterS New International 

Dictionary -The MerriamWebster 



iuiiii(iiiinii | rtmm i( nin [n |iiitiiiiiiinii|iii 



Because J* is , the J °5 : - > ' F cw una " 

bridged dictionary in 

many years. Gives just the accu- 
rate, up-to-date information you 
so often wish. A single volume 
containing the pith and essence 
of an authoritative library of 
the -world's thought, action, 
and culture. 

Because y Qur n ©eds demand 
the highest edi- 



Covers every field of knowledge including 
Agriculture Fiction Medicine p 

Architecture Forestry Music 

Art Law Geography Mythology I 
Chemistry Mathematics Physics = 
Electricity Mechanics Synonyms 



torial scholarship. Editor 
in chief, W. T. Harris, 
Ph.D., LL.D., former 
U. S. Com. of Ed'n. 

Because over 400,000 

Words are 



defined. 2yooPages. 
Oooolllustrations. 

The type matter 
equal to that of a 15- 
volume encyclopedia 



Because *' ^ ^ Q on ^y dictionary 

with the new time-saving 

divided page. "A Stroke of Genius" 

Because ifc ^ as keen ieste ^t a P- 

proved, and accepted by 

leaders in the world's activities. 

Because ^° Know means to Win 

Success. Let us tell 

you about this supreme author- 
ity for all who use English. 
Look for the circular trade- 
mark and our name on the 
title-page. 

, "WJ£fF JR for specimens of the 

* new divided page, 

, illustrations, etc. If you mention 

i this publication, we will send 

FREE, a set of pocket maps. 

G.&C.MERRIAMCO., 
' SPRINGFIELD, MASS., U. S. A. 



jEEii5El55BiS5BfflBBl^ 



MICROCOSM ADVERTISEMENTS 



THE MOST PARTICULAR 

ARE SATISFIED WITH THE 

Choice MEATS and PROVISIONS, 

Fine CREAMERY BUTTER, and 

EGGS, right from the Farm, 

THAT CAN ALWAYS BE PROCURED OF 

WESTON-THURSTON COMPANY 



20, 22 and 24 New Faneuil Hall Market, 

Telephone Richmond 540 



Boston, Mass. 



" I make not my head a grave, but a treasure of knowledge." 

— Browne. 



EIMER& AMEND 

205-211 Third Ave., NEW YORK 



HEADQUARTERS FOR 

Chemical Apparatus 
and C. P. Chemicals 



Laboratory Glass Ware 
Balances and Weights 
Hammered Platinum Ware 
Fuel and Gas Testing Apparatus 
Assay Goods, Furnaces, etc. 

COMPLETE LABORATORY 
EQUIPMENT 



FOR several years we have 
made Gymnasium Suits 
for many Public and 
Private Schools. We shall be 
glad to send you samples of 
materials and quote prices if 
desired. & gi & & gi 



R. H. STEARNS & CO. 



VIII 



'No Oil 



HOWARD 



to Soil" 



A Silk Skirt Can be Cleaned in Five 
Minutes and Made to Look Like New 

THE DUSTER 
does not wear or 
injure the silk. 
This magic cloth cleans 
and dusts all fabric. 
Picks up and holds the 
dust. HOT WATER 
AND SOAP will clean 
the Duster and make it 
as good as new. 




i : 

SOILED SKIRT 




PARTLY CLEANED 



Howard Dustless - Duster 




(25 CENTS PREPAID) 

Makes possible 
a dustless home 



WRITE for our dust book "A." It's 
free. It will show you how to 
make dusting a pleasure, how to 
dry-clean a silk skirt in five minutes, how 
to clean windows in a twinkling, to 
olish pianos and highly finished furniture, 
■ to make cut glass sparkle like diamonds, to 
H make an old derby look like new. 

/Money back if not satisfactory 

Howard Dustless-Duster Co. 

164-26 Federal St., Boston, Mass 




CLEAN SKIRT 



HOWARD 



=- 



THE DUSTER 



THE PACKAGE 



MICROCOSM ADVERTISEMENTS 



"CHOISA" 
CEYLON TEA 




Packed in Parchment-lined 
One pound and half-pound Cannisters 

We invite comparison with other Teas 
of the same or higher price. 

S. S. PIERCE CO. 
Boston - - Brookline 



Bent & Bush Co. 

Designers and Makers of 

College Jewelry 

Fraternity Emblems 



Write or come to 
15 SCHOOL STREET 

BOSTON - - MASS. 



...Simmons Souvenirs 



Banners, Pennants, Post Cards, Die Stamped 



Writing 


Papers, 


Gold 


and 


Silver 


Pins 


and 


Simmons Jewelry 


ii A 


4 


A A 


& Jt 


Ji 



A. D. Maclachlan 

502 BOYLSTON STREET - - BOSTON 



X 



MICROCOSM ADVERTISEMENTS 



Our New and Newly 

REMODELED STORES 

Make by Far the Largest 
Retail Establishment in 
New England 

— and in Fact — 

One of the Greatest 
in the Entire World 

Do Not Fail to Familiarize Yourself With 
This Great Mercantile Institution With 
Its Acres Upon Acres of Selling Space and 
Its Unequaled Modern Appointments 

To Thoroughly Know This Store Is to 
Make It Your %egular Shopping "Place 

Jordan /Marsh Company 



XI 



MICROCOSM ADVERTISEMENTS 



Established 1841 



■=£»<$»<=$>°<=^>-t^.°<^<*^>«^> 



o 

A 



A A 

1 A. Hathaway Co. I 

(INCORPORATED) 9 

A I 

f Carpenters f 

and Builders 



5 77 River Street - Boston, Mass. T 



^^^..^^.^^o^ m 

I I 

Y Telephone Haymarket 1279 J 



XII 




I.I . 



The Good-Night Lunch. 



It is not always an easy task for the woman who has no heip to get 
up a suitable lunch for the friends who have spent the evening with her. 

Very often her enjoyment is marred by the fuss and expense and 
worry which she is obliged to undergo. 

Here is a special use f:r 




The dainties! and mosT: ddicious JELL-O lunch can be prepared in advance, and 
with a minute's work. Serve with whipped cream. Wafers and tea, 
coffee or cocoa complete a lunch that is delightful in every respect. 

The beautilul Recipe Book, "DESSERTS OF THE WORLD," 
tells how to make all sorts ol delicacies. Sent FREE to all who 
write lor it. 

There are seven flavors of JELL-O : Strawberry, Raspberry, 
Lemon, Orange, Cherry, Peach, Chocolate. 

Each flavor in a separate package. lOc. at all grocers'. 

THE GENESEE PURE FOOD CO., 
Le Roy, N. Y., and Bridgeburg, Can. 




Wmm 

wL 






!! i 



I ' Mill 

? ill !i 






H 



1